Juiced Bikes – RipCurrent vs. Rad Power Bikes

Juiced Bikes – RipCurrent vs. Rad Power Bikes

http://www.juicedbikes.com/

Class 3 ready (up to 28 mph with pedal assist) 

Overview

Class 3 is a new regulation adopted from Europe’s “Speed Pedelec” classification. Speed Pedelecs allow e-bikes to assist up to 45 km/h which equals exactly 28 mph. 

Class 3 is the greatest gift to the e-bike community as you can get to your destination faster and more efficiently. The faster speeds also allow you to better keep up with traffic when traveling on surface roads. 

As you get more fit, you will be better able to contribute to the bike’s overall speed. Class 2 bikes will cut off the pedal assist when the bike reaches 20 mph. So if you are able to pedal faster than 20 mph,  you are effectively pedaling a heavy bike on your own once the bike goes beyond 20 mph. 

Both the RipCurrent and Rad Power Bikes “Rad Rover” come out of the box in class 2 mode (20 mph). However, the RipCurrent is designed to be easily configured directly from the LCD display to achieve 28 mph in Class 3 mode where allowed, while the Rad Rover has no Class 3 mode. 

The RipCurrent safely achieves Class 3 / 28 mph by: 

  • Using a more powerful 25 Amp peak controller
  • Higher speed 750W motor winding
  • 52 Volt battery
  • Torque sensor pedal assist
  • 11T/52T Cassette transmission for easier pedaling at high speeds
  • Powerful hydraulic disc brakes to quickly stop from faster speeds

All of these features are missing on the Rad Rover, but are standard features on the RipCurrent (and RipCurrent S)

Torque Sensor vs. Cadence Sensor

Overview:

There are 2 types of pedal assist or PAS. Cadence-based pedal assist and torque based pedal assist. The RipCurrent uses the more advanced Torque Sensor pedal assist, while Rad Power Bike’s Rad Rover uses the Basic Cadence Assist. The difference is like night and day. 

The Torque Sensor pedal assist used on the RipCurrent can sense your exact pedal force and amplify your power in real time. The harder you push on the pedals, the more assist you will get from the motor.  The basic cadence pedal assists used on the Rad Rover just “turn on” the motor at a preset speed the moment you turn the pedal. 

Here are the detailed differences and why you will want the Torque Sensor on your next e-bike. 

Cadence Assist is the most simple type of pedal assist, as featured on the Rad Rover. This uses a magnetic disc to detect when you are pedaling and the motor turns on and when you stop pedaling the motor will turn off. This type of pedal assist is found on almost all entry-level e-bikes. 

The advantage is it is an inexpensive way to gain pedal assist. The disadvantage is that the cadence sensor pedal assist turns on and off the motor like a switch and can feel unnatural and laggy. If the boost is put in the higher settings, the bike can take off suddenly when you turn the pedals. 

Cadence assist-only systems are not allowed in Japan due to safety reasons. Additionally, if the boost is set lower than your desired pedal effort, it will feel like you are pedaling against the motor. 

Torque Based Pedal Assist is a much more advanced technology, and is featured on the RipCurrent. There is a precision strain gauge that measures the exact amount of pressure you put on the pedals. This information is used to work out how much assist to give to the motor in real time. The measurement happens 1,000 times a second and the effect is that the pedal assist is a very smooth and natural feeling. The only way to describe it is “bionic” and the bike feels weightless. It feels totally different from the basic cadence assist which just “turns on” like a motor scooter and you are along for the ride. 

To sum it up: 

Once you try the Torque Sensor type Pedal assist it’s really hard to go back to Cadence-only pedal assist. Most bikes in this class, including the Rad Rover, use basic cadence sensors to reduce cost, but eventually, you will want to have the Torque Sensor pedal assist on your next e-bike if you enjoy pedaling and value a bicycle like riding experience. 

The RipCurrent has both Torque Sensor and Cadence sensors with special motor control software to make the bike feel incredibly sporty and smooth. 

52V vs. 48V Battery Pack

Overview: 

For e-bikes with the hub motor, you want a powerful feeling to assist up hills, accelerate from stops and keep up with traffic. To get both higher power and higher speed, the most direct way is to use a higher voltage battery pack. 

The RipCurrent uses a 52V battery while the Rad Rover uses a 48V battery pack. The difference can be felt right away especially at higher speeds. 

With the higher voltage, the system can continue assisting you like the bike’s speed increases. Lower voltage systems feel like they are “blocking” your pedal efforts once you reach a certain speed. 

A little about Voltage

E-bikes have evolved a lot since the early days. The most direct way to get more power is to increase the voltage. The early e-bikes were 24V, then later the standard moved to 36V and later to 48V but effectively got stuck there. 

Voltage jumped in increments of 12V because the heavy lead-acid batteries which were used in the early days of e-bikes came in 12V format. Each time you added a pack in series, the voltage jumped by 12V. 

When the industry switched over to Lithium battery packs, the lithium battery adapted to the old system. However, lithium battery packs can jump in increments of 3.6V.

To squeeze more performance out of the system without harm to the electronics, some hot-rodders added one more cell in series and the voltage is bumped up to 51.8V. For marketing purposes, the voltage is rounded up to 52V. 

At the time of this writing, Juiced Bikes is the only manufacturer to adopt the 52V platform as we design our own battery packs which is very unusual in this industry. 

We spent about 2 years quietly upgrading all of the system components to properly handle the increased voltage. We expect all e-bikes to be 52V in the future, however, it will take some time for this transition to happen.

Hydraulic Disc vs. Mechanical Disc Brakes

Overview: 

The most overlooked component of the e-bike is the brakes. But the brakes are one of the most important parts of the bike. 

The main thing to know is that there are 2 different types of e-bike brakes. Mechanical and Hydraulic. Hydraulic disc brakes used on the RipCurrent has better stopping power, better brake modulation and self adjust as the pad wears down. 

Mechanical disc brakes found on the Rad Rover have less stopping power and are typically found on lower end and entry level bicycles and not appropriate for use on heavy, fast-moving e-bikes. 

There is a significant difference between the feel of the mechanical and hydraulic disc. The Hydraulics slow the bike much more directly and with less lever force than the mechanical type. Once the bike pads grab the rotor, you have more fine control of the brake pressure on the hydraulic system. 

Mechanical Disc Brakes: 

Mechanical brakes use a cable to pull the brake pads against the rotor. The cable has some flexibility so there is a bit of spongy feel when the brake is activated. 

Additionally, the cable only moves one brake pad, so when the brakes are applied, the rotor is actually bending sideways which is not optimal. 

As the pad wears down, the non-moving inside pad must be constantly adjusted to achieve optimal brake performance. Mechanical brakes are usually chosen to reduce cost. 

Hydraulic Disc Brakes

Hydraulic disc brakes are more modern technology derived from automotive racing. Instead of using a cable to move one brake pad, a non-compressible fluid is used to transmit the lever force to both the brake pads. 

The rotor does not deflect and there is overall improved braking performance over mechanical disc brakes. The lever force is more direct you can feel the pads “punch” toward the rotors.

Because both brake pads move towards the rotor, the pads can self adjust as the pad wears down. This reduces the time wasted to continuously adjust the pads as required with mechanical disc brakes. 

http://www.juicedbikes.com/

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The Electric Godzilla: Fat Tire Rad Rover Test Ride

The Electric Godzilla: Fat Tire Rad Rover Test Ride

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CleanTechnica logo

Bicycles
Rad Rover Electric Fat Tire Fun

Published on February 5th, 2018 |
by Nicolas Zart

February 5th, 2018 by Nicolas Zart 

The first time Rad Power Bikes contacted us, we almost scoffed them off. Rad? Seriously? You need to be pretty rad to use a name like that. And when we put together the pre-assembled kit that came in a big box, we knew we were in for something different. This didn’t look like your average electric bicycle (e-bike).

The Rad Rover is impressive, and in a way the Godzilla of the e-bike world. We just finished our previous test ride of Propella small light e-bike with its razor-thin tires that cut through downtown traffic, and now are transitioning to fat tires. So the question was, how “rad” is the Rad Rover? Does it have enough power to make those fat tires feel like child play or is it all potential? We found the Rad Rover to be plain silly fun in the end.

The Rad Rover Fat Tire Test Ride Is A BLAST!

Rad Rover Electric Fat Tire FunSeriously now, that is one impressive e-bike! It’s big. 66.5 lb big. Did we mention that it’s big? The Rad Rover from Rad Power Bikes towers over our other e-bikes. In the four-wheel electric vehicle (EV) world, it would be a Tesla Model X P100D. It’s an SUV e-bike on steroids, so imagine one of the top SUVs out there. And that is something we would have never considered previously. Once we got on that big e-bike, our initial perspective on it changed. Free to enjoy it without preconceived notions, those big tires are gripping well on our streets.

Seriously, we would never think of designing or even riding such a big e-bike. A tad on the heavy side, pedaling isn’t difficult and getting going in higher gears is very possible. But turn on the electric motor, and the Rad Rover gets moving quickly. With 5 e-assist riding modes, level 1 gets you going with enough power to make you move and get your bearings. As you move up the levels, the motor finally unleashes all of its watts, all 750 of them.

The fun starts in 3rd, 4th, and 5th e-assist mode. All the sudden the peaceful gentle giant lurches forward and brings you progressively up to 20 MPH, bringing along your adrenaline for fun.

Those fat tires give the Rad Rover an extra element of softness. 20 psi is the perfect medium for a cushioned, yet stiffer ride. Comfort is assured via a Velo seat that does the job well. The front rides on a suspension fork.

The 750 W Bafang motor seems disproportionally small for such a big e-bike. But it more than makes up for the weight of the bike. Speaking of which, its full payload is 275 lbs. You can actually haul things around with this e-bike. We could feasibly do a light grocery run with it and a backpack or install a trailer behind it. And just for fun, the Rad Rover has a cruise control, although we haven’t figured that one out yet.

Although it’s big and on the heavy side, it feels sharp despite its fat wheels. In the end, we’ve had a hard time leaving it alone. It just wants to be kept riding. The attention to details is the cherry on top of a well made up cake. The handrests are made out of sturdy leather that matches the seat color.

The Rad Power Bikes Rad Rover Feel and Ride

Rad Rover Electric Fat Tire Fun

You can pedal the Rad Rover, but the weight catches up with you. Although a good workout without it, the generous electric motor is too tempting. Easily reaching and maintaining 20 MPH is a great way to take it further than you would a normal e-bike. It’s an e-bike we’ve learned to love to ride. It’s a lot of fun and we now Rad Rover Electric Fat Tire Funconsider it the happy e-bike. We went from downtown Long Beach, California east on the beach path. After meandering our ways through the streets, we easily put over 20 miles on it in an afternoon. In fact, in two days, we put 40 miles on the brand new bike, enjoying each and every one of them. It’s just that much fun.

You really climb onboard the Rad Rover. As imposing as it is, it makes you feel you’re on top of the game sitting high. After a minute of riding, we found that the fat tires grab and grip the road very well.

The final product is imposing and looks good. The attention to details is refreshing, with a nice handlebar leather touch that just looks good. Although imposing, it is comfortable enough for long distance fat tire riding. Maybe it’s a little closer to an electric scooter or a very tiny electric motorcycle but compared to our last ride of razor-thin small tires, those fat tires are as far opposite as can be!

We told you it was a beefy e-bike. Purists move along as you feast on the performance, driven by a 48V 14Ah (672Wh) Samsung Lithium NCA 18650 35E battery pack, with 48V, for a total of 750W at the rear hub. The company claims a range of 25 to 45 miles, and we can vouch for it so far.

Rad Rover Electric Fat Tire Fun

What’s Up With The Fat Tire Fad?

Fat tires are fun, but you have to pedal. E-bikes help continue that phase with capable electric motors. And for everyday use, they are a lot of fun with a good bite and grab.

One thing is for certain, Rad Power Bikes can claim the word “rad” with its Rad Rover. In some ways, the Rad Rover feels closer to an electric moped than an e-bike, but it is just as capable in a diversified way. It is a complete hoot to ride. Our second thought of the day is, let’s go out and ride the Rad! It’s just that much fun.

Stay tuned for the complete review soon.

Rad Rover Electric Fat Tire Fun 
 

Tags: e-bike, electric bicycle, Electric bike, Rad Power Bikes, Rad Rover

About the Author

Nicolas Zart Nicolas was born and raised around classic cars of the 1920s, but it wasn’t until he drove an AC Propulsion eBox and a Tesla Roadster that the light went on. Ever since he has produced green mobility content on various CleanTech outlets since 2007 and found his home on CleanTechnica.

His communication passion led to cover electric vehicles, autonomous vehicles, renewable energy, test drives, podcasts, shoot pictures, and film for various international outlets in print and online. Nicolas offers an in-depth look at the e-mobility world through interviews and the many contacts he has forged in those industries.

His favorite taglines are: “There are more solutions than obstacles.” and “Yesterday’s Future Now”

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Review: RadRover fat tire electric bicycle is the affordable fat e-bike I’ve been waiting for

Review: RadRover fat tire electric bicycle is the affordable fat e-bike I’ve been waiting for

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Fat-tire electric bicycles, which feature almost comically large extra-wide tires, can be a blast to ride. The wide tires make you feel like you’re riding on a cushion of air. They also allow riders to traverse terrain such as deep sand and snow that would otherwise be nearly impossible on a typical mountain bike. But the problem with fat tire e-bikes its that the good ones are expensive and the cheap ones are, well, cheap.

That’s why I’m so excited by the RadRover fat tire electric bike from Rad Power Bikes. I believe we’ve finally found a goldilocks fat e-bike with a price point and level of quality that is juuuust right.

Who are Rad Power Bikes?

If you aren’t familiar with Rad Power Bikes, they are perhaps one of the fastest growing electric bicycle companies in the US.

Instead of investing in a nationwide dealer network, they’ve built a direct-to-consumer model and cut out the middleman. They do almost all of their sales online, and maintain only a select few retail locations.

While that means it’s harder to find a bike to test ride, you can ultimately get a better quality e-bike for less cash.

And it comes delivered right to your door.

I wanted to try this out for myself, especially since I’ve been itching to find a good electric fat tire bike, and the RadRover presents itself like the perfect option.

RadRover electric fat tire bike video review

Check out my video review of the RadRover below, then read on for my full written thoughts.

RadRover tech specs

Motor: 750 W geared hub motor

Top speed: 32 km/h (20 mph)

Range: 45-72 km (25-45 mi) depending on throttle or pedal assist

Battery: 48V 14Ah (672 Wh)

Charge time: 6 hours

Max load: 125 kg (275 lb)

Frame: 6061 aluminum

Suspension: Front RST spring suspension fork with 80 mm travel

Brakes: Tektro mechanical disc brakes

Extras: LCD display with speedometer, wattmeter, battery gauge, PAS level indicator, odometer, tripmeter, light status indicator, front and rear LED lights with ambient light sensor on front, 5 speed settings, half-twist throttle with disengage button, USB charging port, mounting for front and rear racks

radrover electric fat bike

How’s the quality?

The RadRover is a combination of a nice design and good electrical components, though I’d argue the bicycle components are just decent. For that reason, I’d rate the quality of the bike separately. In terms of an e-bike, I’d say the ‘e’ part is good quality. For the ‘bike’ part, I’d go with medium quality.

The motor is strong and makes only a small amount of noise — nothing you can’t live with. Direct drive motors are always going to be more quiet than this geared motor, but the gear sound isn’t overwhelming. Most importantly the motor works well and pulls you right off the line.

radrover electric fat bike

While some people might prefer a mid-drive motor, keep in mind that you’re talking at least $1,000 more for a mid-drive electric fat bike. The whole point of the RadRover is that it’s affordable, and the rear hub motor is a great choice here.

The display is easy to read and the buttons are intuitive as well as easy to reach.

DSC_0790 copy

I’ve only had the RadRover for a couple weeks, so I can’t really say anything about the longevity of the battery. However, it uses Samsung 35E 18650 battery cells, which are high quality and high capacity cells. I happen to know a thing or two about building batteries (on account of writing a book on the subject) and I can confirm that these are top notch battery cells. They are generally used when capacity is more important than power. But with enough cells in parallel, they can put out excellent power while keeping battery size and weight minimal.

radrover electric fat bike

It’s when we get to the actual bike that the quality takes a bit of a hit. Again, nothing here is bad, it’s just not impressive.

We’re talking Tektro mechanical disc brakes, which are fine. They are Tektro’s entry-level brakes, but they work well.

There’s also a Shimano Acera derailleur on the drivetrain, which is also fine — just another entry-level component.

The RST spring fork is more of the same — fine for what we’re doing here, which is building an affordable but reliable e-bike.

DSC_0800 copy

None of these parts are high end, but they all come from respected brands and are designed to work. You might have to fiddle with your brakes or shifters on occasion to tune them, and you aren’t going to be saving any precious grams with these parts, but you weren’t really worried about weight when you bought a fat bike anyways.

I do like the metal pedals though! Ultra-budget e-bikes often go with plastic pedals. But when you move from ultra-budget to just plain old budget, you get nicer things like metal pedals that will probably outlast the bike.

One component that I think is actually really good is the saddle. It’s wide, plush and super comfortable. Lycra-lovers will probably complain that it’s too large to provide the most efficient pedaling movement. But get real! We threw efficiency out the window when we chose tires wider than our calves.

It also has a grab handle built into the back of the saddle, which is great for maneuvering the bike around in tight quarters like an elevator in your building or a garage.

radrover electric fat bike

An added touch that I really like are the included lights. They are plenty bright and run off the main pack. Plus you can turn them on without reaching down — just hold the Mode and Up button at the same time. The front light even has an ambient light sensor so it can turn on automatically at night. And when you pull the brake levers, the rear light illuminates even brighter, functioning like a brake light in addition to a standard tail light.

The tail light also has a blinky option, though personally I’m anti-blink. I know cyclists think it makes them stand out more — and it probably does — but nothing causes target fixation better than a blinking light.

DSC_0798 copy

The frame itself is actually quite nice. Its 6061 aluminum and has mounting points for a whole pile of bolt-on accessories. Rad Power Bikes has many different styles of racks, fenders bench seats and other accessories that are all designed to mount easily to the bike. And when the base model is this affordable, that leaves room for adding some nice accessories.

So while I’m not blown away by the quality of the RadRover, I’d say I’m impressed with how well they’ve done for the price. Obviously it’s not going to have the high-end parts of bikes twice its price, but it’s not aiming for that market either.

How well does it perform?

Here’s where the RadRover really shines: it’s just a blast to ride!

With its big 4.5″ tires, it can climb over anything. I love transitioning seamlessly from asphalt to grass and dirt, then back to the street. On any other bike that would be a jarring exercise, but on the RadRover I just laugh and aim for the pot holes. Then I hop a curb and ride straight down the middle of the grassy park — paved trails be damned!

The front suspension fork and big big tires contribute to making the ride so nice on a variety of terrains, even without rear suspension.

I was a bit worried that handling would suffer with such big (and heavy) tires, but I was surprised by how nimble the bike was. Obviously it’s not going to compare to a gravel e-bike with tires the size of your thumb. But I took the RadRover on some single track and found that the bike could hop and flick around turns with a level of ease that betrayed its generous size.

Taking it back into my apartment afterwards reminded me of how large the RadRover is. As nimble as the bike feels while riding it, negotiating elevators and hallways is still a bit of a challenge. That seat handle helped, but I’m still jealous of anyone with a garage to keep this bike in.

But let’s not worry about that — I spent a lot more time riding than I spent maneuvering the bike past my couch. And riding is where the bike excels. To be fair, I didn’t do a whole lot of pedaling. I’m a bit lazy and that half-twist throttle is tempting. I found myself riding the RadRover more like a motocross bike most of the time. But when I could muster some self control, I switched into pedal assist mode and got some exercise.

On the higher pedal assist levels (there are five total), pedaling is a breeze. If you really want a workout though, put it in level 1. The same big wheels and tires that make this bike so much fun also make it harder to pedal without electrical assist. I never ran out of battery, but if I ever do then I really hope I’m at a higher elevation than at home. I wouldn’t want to pedal this bike up hill for too long without the e-assist. But with over 600 Wh of battery, you should have plenty of charge for an afternoon of fun.

The one thing that bugged me about the riding experience is the 32 km/h (20 mph) limit on the motor. It’s fine that it’s there, and it keeps the bike in the Class 2 designation. But the limit comes on kind of suddenly. When you grab a handful of throttle, you rocket towards 20 mph. But when you hit the limit, you can feel the power suddenly cut out. I’d rather see it begin to ease off at around 18 mph and reduce towards 20 mph. That way you don’t feel the sudden loss of acceleration.

The good news is that this only really happens on throttle acceleration — things go smoother on pedal assist. And it’s not really a problem, it’s just something that I feel could be made a tad more comfortable. And ironically it’s probably caused by the motor being so powerful. If the motor was weaker, I wouldn’t notice as much when it cuts out. But I also wouldn’t be speaking so highly of this bike if it had a weaker motor either. So I’d rather have a more noticeable power cutout at 20 mph than spend too long struggling to reach that speed.

My verdict

I’m definitely a fan of the RadRover and I’m glad I finally got a chance to try it. This bike reminds me of why I started riding e-bikes to begin with: they’re just so much fun.

When you can ride just as well in the bike lane or over pea gravel, the whole world becomes your bike path. With those big tires, the RadRover can tackle just about anything. Hell, there’s so much air in those tires that it might even float… not that I recommend trying that. The battery has a 1-year warranty but it doesn’t cover water damage.

But as long as you stick to (mostly) dry land, the RadRover should be able to handle any trail you can find. It’s a comfortable bike with components that are all in the “good enough” sweet spot without jacking up the price too high. Sure, you could try your hand at building your own electric fat bike to save some money. But if you prefer having a reputable company to deal with and a warranty to rely on, then this is an excellent bike to have some real fun on for just $1,499.

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About the Author

Micah Toll’s favorite gear

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Rad Power Bikes RadRover Review

Rad Power Bikes RadRover Review

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  • An affordable, powerful, electric fat bike with responsive 12-magnet pedal assist and twist-throttle on demand, available in two colors with lots of accessory options including fenders and racks
  • Only one frame size but the top tube is sloped and the shorter stem pairs nicely with the mid-rise handlebar for upright or forward body position and taller or shorter riders, sturdy oversized pedals
  • Spring suspension fork with compression clicker, lockout, and preload adjust, custom Kenda tires with K-Shield puncture protection, the fat tires offer a good PSI range for improved comfort and managing soft terrain like sand and snow, optional suspension seat post
  • Integrated headlight and back light but could get blocked by your coat or a rear rack bag, nice adjustable kickstand, great price with optional Velofix assembly and delivery pack with locked-off mode, great price with optional Velofix assembly and delivery

Make:

Rad Power Bikes

Model:

RadRover

Price:

$1,499

Body Position:

Forward, Upright

Suggested Use:

Neighborhood, Sand and Snow, Trail

Warranty:

1 Year Comprehensive

Availability:

United States, Canada

Model Year:

2019

Total Weight:

68 lbs (30.84 kg)

Battery Weight:

7.7 lbs (3.49 kg)

Motor Weight:

8.7 lbs (3.94 kg)

Frame Material:

6061 Aluminum Alloy

Frame Sizes:

18 in (45.72 cm)

Geometry Measurements:

18″ Seat Tube, 30.5″ Stand Over Height, 22.5″ Reach, 30.5″ Standover Height, 33″ Minimum Saddle Height, 28.5″ Width, 75″ Length

Frame Types:

High-Step

Frame Colors:

Satin Black with Gray and Orange Accents, Gloss White with Orange Accents

Frame Fork Details:

RST Spring Suspension, 100mm Travel, Compression Adjust with Lockout, Preload Adjust, 32mm Stanchions, 135mm Hub Spacing, 9mm Axle with Quick Release Skewer

Frame Rear Details:

170mm Hub Spacing, 12mm Threaded Axle with 10mm Flats, 18mm Nuts

Attachment Points:

Fender Bosses, Front Rack Bosses, Rear Rack Bosses, Bottle Cage Bosses

Gearing Details:

7
Speed 1×7 Shimano Acera Derailleur, DNP Nickel Plated 11-34 Tooth Freewheel

Shifter Details:

Shimano SIS Index Thumb Shifter on Right

Cranks:

Aluminum Alloy, 170mm Length, 42 Tooth Chainring with Prowheel Ounce Alloy Guide

Pedals:

Wellgo Aluminum Alloy Platform with Reflectors, CrMo Axle, Black

Headset:

Semi-Integrated, Sealed Cartridge, 1-1/8″ Straight

Stem:

Aluminum Alloy, Promax, 50mm Length, 30º Angle, 15mm Rise, Two 10mm Spacers, One 20mm Spacer, 31.8mm Clamp

Handlebar:

Aluminum Alloy, Mid-Rise, Aluminum Alloy, 720mm Length, 80mm Rise

Brake Details:

Tektro Aries Mechanical Disc with 180mm Rotors, Four-Finger Tektro Levers with Rubberized Edges and Bell on Left and Motor Inhibitors and Brake Light Activation

Grips:

Ergonomic, Stitched Imitation Leather

Saddle:

Velo Plush with Lifting Handle

Seat Post:

Promax, Aluminum Alloy

Seat Post Length:

350 mm

Seat Post Diameter:

27.2 mm

Rims:

Aluminum Alloy, Double Wall, 80mm Width, 36 Hole

Spokes:

Stainless Steel, 12 Gauge, Black with Nipples

Tire Brand:

Kenda x Rad Power Bikes Juggernaut, 26″ x 4″ (98-559)

Wheel Sizes:

26 in (66.04cm)

Tire Details:

5 to 30 PSI, 0.4 to 2.1 BAR, 30 TPI, Reflective Sidewall Stripe, K-Shield Puncture Protection

Tube Details:

Schrader Valve

Accessories:

Rear-Mount Adjustable Kickstand, Steel Derailleur Guard, Integrated Spanninga Axendo 60 LED Headlight, Integrated Spanninga Solo LED Backlight (Solid, Flashing, Braking), Neoprene Slap Guard, Optional Bolt-On Rear Rack with Yepp! Window ($80), Optional Plastic Fenders (105mm Width, $89), Optional Front Rack ($69), Optional Small Basket ($59), Optional Large Basket ($79), Optional Platform ($39), Optional Small Pannier (Fremont Bag $89), Optional RAD Backlight ($25), Optional SR Suntour NCX Seat Post Suspension ($109), Optional RAM Torque Handlebar Phone Mount X ($59), Optional Small Basket Bag ($44), Optional Large Basket Bag ($59), Optional Small Insulated Delivery Bag ($59), Optional Large Insulated Delivery Bag ($69), Optional Yepp! Maxi Child Seat ($199)

Other:

Locking Removable Downtube-Mounted Battery Pack, 1.1lb 2 Amp Charger, Fully Potted Motor Controller, Stainless Steel Torque Arm, 275lb Maximum Weight Rating

Motor Brand:

Bafang, RadRover Specific

Motor Nominal Output:

750 watts

Motor Torque:

80 Newton meters

Battery Brand:

Samsung 18650 35E 3500mAH 13S4P Configuration

Battery Voltage:

48 volts

Battery Amp Hours:

14 ah

Battery Watt Hours:

672 wh

Battery Chemistry:

Lithium NCA (LiNiCoAlO2)

Charge Time:

6 hours

Estimated Min Range:

25 miles (40 km)

Estimated Max Range:

45 miles (72 km)

Display Type:

Rad Power Bikes Branded King Meter SWLCD, Fixed, Adjustable-Angle, Backlit, Grayscale LCD, Integrated 5 Volt 1 Amp USB Type-A Port Below Display

Readouts:

Battery Indicator (5 Bars), Trip Meter, Odometer, Current Speed, Average Speed, Max Speed, Pedal Assist Level (0-5 as Eco, Std, Power, Speed), Light Icon, Motor Power Watts

Display Accessories:

Independent Control Pad on Left, Buttons: Up, Mode, Down, (Lights: Hold Up and Mode, Cycle Readouts: Press Mode or Hold Up, Settings: Hold Up and Down, Walk Mode: Hold Down), Throttle On/Off Button on Right

Drive Mode:

Cadence Sensing Pedal Assist, Twist Throttle
(12-Magnet Cadence Sensor)

Top Speed:

20 mph (32 kph)

To run the forums, host the website, and travel, I charge a universal service fee for my reviews. This in-depth review was sponsored by Rad Power Bikes. My goal is to be transparent and unbiased, this video and written review are not meant to be an endorsement of RAD products.

For Rad Power Bikes, the RadRover is the bike that launched the company into the brand name it is today. I was fortunate enough to be invited to Seattle by RPB to get some hands on experience with this bike which they consider their flagship model. Right as the fat tire bike craze began, Rad Power was one the first to offer an electric version. As the years have gone by, many fat tire bikes have come and gone, but the RadRover has remained as a bike the company is very proud of. Each year the bike receives new upgrades and that brings us to the 2019 we have in front of us today. Just glancing at the bike and you can instantly assess there is an improved look and feel. As mentioned before, this is their flagship model, so we get some upgraded decals and graphics as well as two color options. Also new for 2019 is a set of custom set of Kenda tires. These thick knobby tires are 26″x4″ and feature not only K-Shield puncture protection, but also a reflective sidewall stripping which I really appreciate. Another good upgrade to the bike is the nickel plated DNP freewheel which not only shifts smoothly, but will hold up better over time. The lighting has been refined as the bike now features both a rear and front battery integrated lights. The front light is a Spanninga Axendo and features an active daylight sensor. On the rear light, you have a flashing mode and the ability to function as an active break light, getting brighter as you press on the brakes. Again we find a USB charging plug under the display, but this year it has been upgraded to put out 1 amp which should help maintain a charge on your device better than the previous 500 mA. The brake caliper has been moved and is no longer in the way. The 180mm mechanical disc brakes have received a newer style disc rotors which I am told improves braking power and reduces noise. The front fork is an RST spring suspension with 100mm Travel. It has compression adjust with lockout, preload adjust, 32mm stanchions, and an axle with a quick release skewer. The whole bike really provides a stable and comfortable ride. The sloped top tube, the relatively low standover height, the riser style handlebar, and the Velo Plush saddle just come together with the fat tire ride to give you a feeling that the bike is hugging you. If you drive it on the pavement, it’s a fun experience, but it really excels in sand, snow, or even loamy territory if you really drop the tire pressure.

Rad Power Bikes uses a higher resolution 12-magnet sensor that will start and stop faster. It’s just not as dynamic as a torque sensor and can produce an on/off experience along with delays that aren’t ideal for technical off-road riding. Starting might not be as fast, but you can always override and stop the motor by pulling either brake lever, because they both have motor inhibitor switches. Given that the motor used here is a fat-bike specific 750 watt part from Bafang, it’s great to have an override. The motor is compact and slightly lighter than the gearless direct drive hub motor used on the RadWagon and RadCity models, but it’s also louder because it uses three planetary reduction gears to generate power. I really like this motor because it’s extra wide, providing better spoke bracing support, and I like that Rad Power Bikes has opted for thicker 12 gauge spokes and even made them black to blend in with the motor casing and rims. The rims themselves seem alright, but don’t feature punched out holes to reduce weight and provide some liner flex like the fancier fat e-bikes I’ve seen lately. Also, the motor power cable is a bit exposed, protruding from the right axle. You really don’t want to bend or cut this cable because it could create inconsistent response or even stop working… so it’s nice to see that Rad Power Bikes has added a derailleur guard that also surrounds the power cable. On other bikes I have filmed, you can see where this guard had been scraped up when a bike tipped or got pushed against another bike or wall. The chain is also well-protected on this bike because there’s a pair of aluminum alloy plates on the chainring which reduce drops and keep your pant leg from getting greasy or snagged. I really like this sort of attention to detail and appreciate that even though you get a more limited number of gears, the lowest gear is extra low for easier climbing (which could come in handy if your battery runs out) and that the derailleur is two steps up from base level in the Shimano line, the Acera part should hold true longer between tuneups.

The battery pack is slim and mounts to the frame on a track that bolts down in three places for added strength, and can still be charged on or off the frame (making it convenient for commuting and easier to care for in extreme heat or cold weather). Considering just how large and heavy the RadRover is, I could see myself storing the bike outside or in a shed and then bringing the battery into a neutral, dry location for safe keeping. If you know it’s very cold out, keep the battery warm before taking a ride because otherwise the cells won’t last as long. If you plan to store the pack for more than a month without using it, I have heard that keeping it around 50% full can be easier on the Lithium-ion cells. The actual cells inside are Samsung 18650 size 35E high energy density. It impressed me to discover that this 48 volt 14 amp hour pack can be replaced for just $499, and I think that’s partially because the controller unit is made separate. This reduces complexity, heat exposure, and makes fixes easier… but it doesn’t look quite as good. Even though the RadRover is a purpose-built electric bicycle, the battery and controller box are still external… and it’s not as efficient or effective at climbing as some of the new mid-drives, or as balanced. All things considered, I feel that weight is still distributed well, and I love that little things like a neoprene slap guard, larger wider pedals, and bottle cage bosses have all been added to make the experience as good as it can be.

Using the RadRover electronically is simple. To activate the display, just hold the Mode button in the middle of the rubberized control pad (near the left grip) and it blinks to life. This display is not removable, but it does swivel forward and back just enough to reduce glare. It’s large, which makes it easy to read from a distance, and it shows your battery level, trip stats, speed, and assist level 0-5. If you press the mode button, it cycles from trip distance to total distance (odometer), and if you hold the up arrow it will cycle from current speed to average speed and max speed. For those who want to mess around with settings, hold the up and down arrow keys simultaneously, and for those dark riding moments (or to be extra safe during the daytime) just hold up and mode simultaneously to activate the headlight. The final tip I have is that you can hold the down arrow while the bike is in assist levels 1-5 to activate walk mode, which can be very handy if you have to walk a difficult section of trail, cross a non-bikeable area with a loaded rack, or get a flat tire. I love that in addition to the range of power levels that you can ride with, the throttle offers full power at all times. This is nice for saving energy but still having access to quick bursts of power for climbing or catching up to friends. And, the throttle can be completely shut off if you want, just press the black toggle button near the right grip. This is very useful when mounting the bike, walking it, or picking it up. Of course, I recommend always disabling the bike completely by turning it off to be extra safe when handling. I should also mention that the charger for all Rad Power Bikes is just 1.1 lbs and offers a standard 2 Amps output for ~6 hour charging from empty. It’s not the fanciest thing in the world but it gets the job done without being too bulky and I like that the charging port on the battery is positioned out of the way of the crank arms so it won’t get snagged or bent as easily.

All in all the RadRover is a great way to get around varied terrain and delivers the fun on and off road. There are a ton of available accessories for all of RPB’s bikes. For the RadRover, I definitely recommend the fenders as they really help keep things clean when you are roving about. Rad Power is a featured online retailer so not only do you get top notch tech support and a 1 year warranty, but they also have also partnered with Velofix. Velofix is a mobile bike repair company with many service vans in towns and cities across the states. Velofix can even assemble your RPB eBike once you have purchased it for $100. As with their other offerings, the RadRover is a great value proposition eBike. Rad Power also prefers mechanical brakes for the low maintenance cost and ease of adjustment. But still, it would have been nice to see a flagship bike with a proper set of hydraulic brakes. So many of Rad’s bikes come with different accessories like a rear rack, or fenders. Unfortunately, the RadRover comes with none, so if you want some of those benefits, make sure to set aside some extra money. Tradeoffs aside, the RadRover is hard to beat. The words“comfort” and “fun” rarely go hand in hand, much like “inexpensive” and “quality”. The RadRover manages to check off all those boxes which is no small feat, a deserves its title as a flagship. I would like to take this opportunity to thank Rad Power Bikes for welcoming me to their headquarters and letting me get to know these bikes. I really appreciate feedback and questions, make sure to make them known in the comments below or in the forums, I’ll do my best to answer.

Pros:

  • Fat 4″ tires, a 100 mm spring suspension fork, adjustable-angle stem, and a mid-rise handlebar with shorter stem work together to provide more comfort, you can achieve an upright body position and the Velo Plush saddle and ergonomic grips further this experience
  • Great aesthetics, the hydroformed aluminum alloy frame is smooth, thicker near the head tube for strength, and stepped in and flattened out where the battery mounts which provides a sturdier surface
  • Even though the battery and control box are mounted externally, this is a purpose-built electric bike with internally routed cables and wires, note the stainless steel torque arm on the rear left dropout for added frame strength
  • Available in two refined colors with nicer accents, some of the older RadRovers looked a lot simpler but it has always been nice to choose from a dark and light color because the white is going to be more visible at night and that could make it safer
  • Safety is a big consideration for me as a cyclist who rides in the city occasionally, so I love that Rad Power Bikes has been including new battery integrated lights and that the headlight is extra bright and aimable while the rear light can function as an active brake light
  • It’s cool that Rad Power Bikes has expanded to Europe and Canada, and specced their motor down from 750 watts to 500 watts in order to comply, they offer free shipping and in the US are partnering with Velofix for assembly and delivery for an additional $100
  • I like the sturdy Wellgo platform pedals, alloy chain guide, and steel derailleur guard on this bike because it means you won’t slip off as easily, won’t have the chain dropping, and can keep the sensitive shifter parts and motor power cable from getting bent or snagged if the bike tips or is parked in a crowded rack
  • The battery design is awesome, it’s slim, can be locked to the frame in an off position to prevent tampering with the display, can be charged on or off the bike, is using energy dense Samsung 35E cells that take up less space and weigh less, and it’s only $499 to replace because the controller unit is separate
  • In addition to the bottle cage bosses along the downtube, this bike has tons of optional accessories that look great and provide massive utility such as wide plastic fenders, a rear rack with reflective pannier bags, a front platform rack and basket, a phone mount, and a suspension seat post upgrade
  • The display is large and easy to read, it angles slightly to help you reduce glare, and I love that it has a standard sized USB port on the bottom so you can maintain a phone or other portable electronics as you ride, interacting with the display is easy and safe because the button pad is mounted within reach of the left grip
  • The RadRover has a high-resolution 12-magnet cadence sensors and this makes starting and stopping more predictable, I love that they also included motor inhibitors on both brake levers and that you can disable the throttle with the on/off toggle button near the right grip
  • The kickstand is adjustable, has a wide platform at the bottom to keep it from sinking in to soft terrain, and it works well if you’re loading the bike with gear, I love that the front rack is frame-mounted so it won’t interfere with steering or tip the bike sideways when parked like fork mounted racks
  • Both wheels are built with thicker 12 gauge spokes for increased durability and weight capacity on the bike, the official max weight rating is 275 pounds (~125 kilograms)
  • The geared hub motor is quite zippy and powerful, more so than the RadWagon and RadCity models which use a gearless hub motor… so the geared motor doesn’t offer regeneration and it does produce some more noise, but it’s torquey enough to power through snow and soft sand if you lower the tire PSI to the 5-10 range

Cons:

  • Only one frame size for the RadRover but that’s part of what keeps the price down, the top tube is sloped to lower stand-over height and the adjustable seat post and stem provide a range of fit options
  • I’m not a huge fan of the big thumb shifter design because it seems like I have to stretch my right hand to reach it and the gears don’t shift as quickly or crisply, but the team at RPB told me this part was chosen to make room for their throttle on/off switch which is a great safety feature… so I’m okay with it
  • The 180 mm mechanical disc brakes worked well during my ride test but I definitely prefer hydraulic because the levers are easier to pull and can be reach-adjusted for small and large hands, this is one part on the bike that seems to be a compromise in order to keep the price lower, it would be nice to se hydraulic brakes in a flagship model
  • One consideration with the spring fork is that it’s heavier than an air fork and uses a straight steering post vs. tapered along with a 9 mm skewer vs. 15 mm thru-axle which means it’s not as stiff and sturdy or upgradeable as many of the more expensive products out there, at least it has compression lockout and preload adjust though
  • The optional rear rack is great for hauling gear but if you add a trunk bag on top, it could block the seat post mounted light (so consider moving it or getting another light for the back of the rack) and it seems like this rack would limit how low you could position the saddle before it collides, this is not the case with the RadCity and RadWagon models which have integrated racks that are wider so the saddle can go low even with gear
  • The way that the rear light is setup, the large rear tire basically blocks it from view, it would be better if the light was somehow mounted higher or off to the side… but if you get the optional rack and move the light, this is solved
  • The display is large and easy to read but not removable, so it could take extra weather wear and possibly get scratched at a bike rack or if the bike gets crashed but it seems well protected in the lower section of the mid-rise handlebars
  • There are some advantages to the new rear brake caliper position (wires aren’t in the path of the optional rear rack) but the way it’s tipped back, it seems like water and dust could collect on the wire and get pulled down into the cable housing over time, creating some friction and drag in the brake system and more work for your right hand pulling the rear brake lever, this would not be an issue if it used a hydraulic brake line vs. mechanical

Resources:

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To run the forums, host the website, and travel, I charge a universal service fee for my reviews. This in-depth review was sponsored by Rad Power Bikes. My goal is to be transparent and unbiased, this video and written review are not meant to be an endorsement of RAD products.

For Rad Power Bikes, the RadRover is the bike that launched the company into the brand name it is today. I was fortunate enough to be invited to Seattle by RPB to get some hands on experience with this bike which they consider their flagship model. Right as the fat tire bike craze began, Rad Power was one the first to offer an electric version. As the years have gone by, many fat tire bikes have come and gone, but the RadRover has remained as a bike the company is very proud of. Each year the bike receives new upgrades and that brings us to the 2019 we have in front of us today. Just glancing at the bike and you can instantly assess there is an improved look and feel. As mentioned before, this is their flagship model, so we get some upgraded decals and graphics as well as two color options. Also new for 2019 is a set of custom set of Kenda tires. These thick knobby tires are 26″x4″ and feature not only K-Shield puncture protection, but also a reflective sidewall stripping which I really appreciate. Another good upgrade to the bike is the nickel plated DNP freewheel which not only shifts smoothly, but will hold up better over time. The lighting has been refined as the bike now features both a rear and front battery integrated lights. The front light is a Spanninga Axendo and features an active daylight sensor. On the rear light, you have a flashing mode and the ability to function as an active break light, getting brighter as you press on the brakes. Again we find a USB charging plug under the display, but this year it has been upgraded to put out 1 amp which should help maintain a charge on your device better than the previous 500 mA. The brake caliper has been moved and is no longer in the way. The 180mm mechanical disc brakes have received a newer style disc rotors which I am told improves braking power and reduces noise. The front fork is an RST spring suspension with 100mm Travel. It has compression adjust with lockout, preload adjust, 32mm stanchions, and an axle with a quick release skewer. The whole bike really provides a stable and comfortable ride. The sloped top tube, the relatively low standover height, the riser style handlebar, and the Velo Plush saddle just come together with the fat tire ride to give you a feeling that the bike is hugging you. If you drive it on the pavement, it’s a fun experience, but it really excels in sand, snow, or even loamy territory if you really drop the tire pressure.

Rad Power Bikes uses a higher resolution 12-magnet sensor that will start and stop faster. It’s just not as dynamic as a torque sensor and can produce an on/off experience along with delays that aren’t ideal for technical off-road riding. Starting might not be as fast, but you can always override and stop the motor by pulling either brake lever, because they both have motor inhibitor switches. Given that the motor used here is a fat-bike specific 750 watt part from Bafang, it’s great to have an override. The motor is compact and slightly lighter than the gearless direct drive hub motor used on the RadWagon and RadCity models, but it’s also louder because it uses three planetary reduction gears to generate power. I really like this motor because it’s extra wide, providing better spoke bracing support, and I like that Rad Power Bikes has opted for thicker 12 gauge spokes and even made them black to blend in with the motor casing and rims. The rims themselves seem alright, but don’t feature punched out holes to reduce weight and provide some liner flex like the fancier fat e-bikes I’ve seen lately. Also, the motor power cable is a bit exposed, protruding from the right axle. You really don’t want to bend or cut this cable because it could create inconsistent response or even stop working… so it’s nice to see that Rad Power Bikes has added a derailleur guard that also surrounds the power cable. On other bikes I have filmed, you can see where this guard had been scraped up when a bike tipped or got pushed against another bike or wall. The chain is also well-protected on this bike because there’s a pair of aluminum alloy plates on the chainring which reduce drops and keep your pant leg from getting greasy or snagged. I really like this sort of attention to detail and appreciate that even though you get a more limited number of gears, the lowest gear is extra low for easier climbing (which could come in handy if your battery runs out) and that the derailleur is two steps up from base level in the Shimano line, the Acera part should hold true longer between tuneups.

The battery pack is slim and mounts to the frame on a track that bolts down in three places for added strength, and can still be charged on or off the frame (making it convenient for commuting and easier to care for in extreme heat or cold weather). Considering just how large and heavy the RadRover is, I could see myself storing the bike outside or in a shed and then bringing the battery into a neutral, dry location for safe keeping. If you know it’s very cold out, keep the battery warm before taking a ride because otherwise the cells won’t last as long. If you plan to store the pack for more than a month without using it, I have heard that keeping it around 50% full can be easier on the Lithium-ion cells. The actual cells inside are Samsung 18650 size 35E high energy density. It impressed me to discover that this 48 volt 14 amp hour pack can be replaced for just $499, and I think that’s partially because the controller unit is made separate. This reduces complexity, heat exposure, and makes fixes easier… but it doesn’t look quite as good. Even though the RadRover is a purpose-built electric bicycle, the battery and controller box are still external… and it’s not as efficient or effective at climbing as some of the new mid-drives, or as balanced. All things considered, I feel that weight is still distributed well, and I love that little things like a neoprene slap guard, larger wider pedals, and bottle cage bosses have all been added to make the experience as good as it can be.

Using the RadRover electronically is simple. To activate the display, just hold the Mode button in the middle of the rubberized control pad (near the left grip) and it blinks to life. This display is not removable, but it does swivel forward and back just enough to reduce glare. It’s large, which makes it easy to read from a distance, and it shows your battery level, trip stats, speed, and assist level 0-5. If you press the mode button, it cycles from trip distance to total distance (odometer), and if you hold the up arrow it will cycle from current speed to average speed and max speed. For those who want to mess around with settings, hold the up and down arrow keys simultaneously, and for those dark riding moments (or to be extra safe during the daytime) just hold up and mode simultaneously to activate the headlight. The final tip I have is that you can hold the down arrow while the bike is in assist levels 1-5 to activate walk mode, which can be very handy if you have to walk a difficult section of trail, cross a non-bikeable area with a loaded rack, or get a flat tire. I love that in addition to the range of power levels that you can ride with, the throttle offers full power at all times. This is nice for saving energy but still having access to quick bursts of power for climbing or catching up to friends. And, the throttle can be completely shut off if you want, just press the black toggle button near the right grip. This is very useful when mounting the bike, walking it, or picking it up. Of course, I recommend always disabling the bike completely by turning it off to be extra safe when handling. I should also mention that the charger for all Rad Power Bikes is just 1.1 lbs and offers a standard 2 Amps output for ~6 hour charging from empty. It’s not the fanciest thing in the world but it gets the job done without being too bulky and I like that the charging port on the battery is positioned out of the way of the crank arms so it won’t get snagged or bent as easily.

All in all the RadRover is a great way to get around varied terrain and delivers the fun on and off road. There are a ton of available accessories for all of RPB’s bikes. For the RadRover, I definitely recommend the fenders as they really help keep things clean when you are roving about. Rad Power is a featured online retailer so not only do you get top notch tech support and a 1 year warranty, but they also have also partnered with Velofix. Velofix is a mobile bike repair company with many service vans in towns and cities across the states. Velofix can even assemble your RPB eBike once you have purchased it for $100. As with their other offerings, the RadRover is a great value proposition eBike. Rad Power also prefers mechanical brakes for the low maintenance cost and ease of adjustment. But still, it would have been nice to see a flagship bike with a proper set of hydraulic brakes. So many of Rad’s bikes come with different accessories like a rear rack, or fenders. Unfortunately, the RadRover comes with none, so if you want some of those benefits, make sure to set aside some extra money. Tradeoffs aside, the RadRover is hard to beat. The words“comfort” and “fun” rarely go hand in hand, much like “inexpensive” and “quality”. The RadRover manages to check off all those boxes which is no small feat, a deserves its title as a flagship. I would like to take this opportunity to thank Rad Power Bikes for welcoming me to their headquarters and letting me get to know these bikes. I really appreciate feedback and questions, make sure to make them known in the comments below or in the forums, I’ll do my best to answer.

Pros:

  • Fat 4″ tires, a 100 mm spring suspension fork, adjustable-angle stem, and a mid-rise handlebar with shorter stem work together to provide more comfort, you can achieve an upright body position and the Velo Plush saddle and ergonomic grips further this experience
  • Great aesthetics, the hydroformed aluminum alloy frame is smooth, thicker near the head tube for strength, and stepped in and flattened out where the battery mounts which provides a sturdier surface
  • Even though the battery and control box are mounted externally, this is a purpose-built electric bike with internally routed cables and wires, note the stainless steel torque arm on the rear left dropout for added frame strength
  • Available in two refined colors with nicer accents, some of the older RadRovers looked a lot simpler but it has always been nice to choose from a dark and light color because the white is going to be more visible at night and that could make it safer
  • Safety is a big consideration for me as a cyclist who rides in the city occasionally, so I love that Rad Power Bikes has been including new battery integrated lights and that the headlight is extra bright and aimable while the rear light can function as an active brake light
  • It’s cool that Rad Power Bikes has expanded to Europe and Canada, and specced their motor down from 750 watts to 500 watts in order to comply, they offer free shipping and in the US are partnering with Velofix for assembly and delivery for an additional $100
  • I like the sturdy Wellgo platform pedals, alloy chain guide, and steel derailleur guard on this bike because it means you won’t slip off as easily, won’t have the chain dropping, and can keep the sensitive shifter parts and motor power cable from getting bent or snagged if the bike tips or is parked in a crowded rack
  • The battery design is awesome, it’s slim, can be locked to the frame in an off position to prevent tampering with the display, can be charged on or off the bike, is using energy dense Samsung 35E cells that take up less space and weigh less, and it’s only $499 to replace because the controller unit is separate
  • In addition to the bottle cage bosses along the downtube, this bike has tons of optional accessories that look great and provide massive utility such as wide plastic fenders, a rear rack with reflective pannier bags, a front platform rack and basket, a phone mount, and a suspension seat post upgrade
  • The display is large and easy to read, it angles slightly to help you reduce glare, and I love that it has a standard sized USB port on the bottom so you can maintain a phone or other portable electronics as you ride, interacting with the display is easy and safe because the button pad is mounted within reach of the left grip
  • The RadRover has a high-resolution 12-magnet cadence sensors and this makes starting and stopping more predictable, I love that they also included motor inhibitors on both brake levers and that you can disable the throttle with the on/off toggle button near the right grip
  • The kickstand is adjustable, has a wide platform at the bottom to keep it from sinking in to soft terrain, and it works well if you’re loading the bike with gear, I love that the front rack is frame-mounted so it won’t interfere with steering or tip the bike sideways when parked like fork mounted racks
  • Both wheels are built with thicker 12 gauge spokes for increased durability and weight capacity on the bike, the official max weight rating is 275 pounds (~125 kilograms)
  • The geared hub motor is quite zippy and powerful, more so than the RadWagon and RadCity models which use a gearless hub motor… so the geared motor doesn’t offer regeneration and it does produce some more noise, but it’s torquey enough to power through snow and soft sand if you lower the tire PSI to the 5-10 range

Cons:

  • Only one frame size for the RadRover but that’s part of what keeps the price down, the top tube is sloped to lower stand-over height and the adjustable seat post and stem provide a range of fit options
  • I’m not a huge fan of the big thumb shifter design because it seems like I have to stretch my right hand to reach it and the gears don’t shift as quickly or crisply, but the team at RPB told me this part was chosen to make room for their throttle on/off switch which is a great safety feature… so I’m okay with it
  • The 180 mm mechanical disc brakes worked well during my ride test but I definitely prefer hydraulic because the levers are easier to pull and can be reach-adjusted for small and large hands, this is one part on the bike that seems to be a compromise in order to keep the price lower, it would be nice to se hydraulic brakes in a flagship model
  • One consideration with the spring fork is that it’s heavier than an air fork and uses a straight steering post vs. tapered along with a 9 mm skewer vs. 15 mm thru-axle which means it’s not as stiff and sturdy or upgradeable as many of the more expensive products out there, at least it has compression lockout and preload adjust though
  • The optional rear rack is great for hauling gear but if you add a trunk bag on top, it could block the seat post mounted light (so consider moving it or getting another light for the back of the rack) and it seems like this rack would limit how low you could position the saddle before it collides, this is not the case with the RadCity and RadWagon models which have integrated racks that are wider so the saddle can go low even with gear
  • The way that the rear light is setup, the large rear tire basically blocks it from view, it would be better if the light was somehow mounted higher or off to the side… but if you get the optional rack and move the light, this is solved
  • The display is large and easy to read but not removable, so it could take extra weather wear and possibly get scratched at a bike rack or if the bike gets crashed but it seems well protected in the lower section of the mid-rise handlebars
  • There are some advantages to the new rear brake caliper position (wires aren’t in the path of the optional rear rack) but the way it’s tipped back, it seems like water and dust could collect on the wire and get pulled down into the cable housing over time, creating some friction and drag in the brake system and more work for your right hand pulling the rear brake lever, this would not be an issue if it used a hydraulic brake line vs. mechanical

Resources:

January 31, 2019 (7 months ago)

January 31, 2019 (7 months ago)

Source

2019 RadRover – an honest review by Bolton Ebikes – Electric Bike Videos & Price Comparison

2019 RadRover – an honest review by Bolton Ebikes – Electric Bike Videos & Price Comparison

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Wow. For a ebike delivered straight to the customer, that is one whopping big piece of poor quality control. Very few people have the skills you do for trouble-shooting, and to identify a cord INSIDE the frame, that was disconnected would be impossible for MOST consumers. Rad’s support for troubleshooting would not catch that either. I have dealt with them. They are at best mediocre. For consumer direct, you have to be better THAN EVERYONE else on the market, or you die, especially without dealerships to see and trouble shoot first hand. The size is absolutely a poor fit for anyone below 5’11” and above 6’2″. Its a really short in length ebike, and the short wheelbase is ridiculous for fat tires. It looks very crowded. Even at $1200, this could be over priced. You wont get over 30 miles on this ebike. Trust me, with that motor. I disagree on your opinion. You should range test it like Pete Preibus. Its NOT a 750 watt ebike. Its barely a 500 watt ebike. I would not for one minute believe their torque rating at 80 NM. Put it up against a Magnum Metro+ or Metro, which has a true 80 nm torque rating, and you’lll notice a HUGE difference on hilll climbing acceleration through the range, and acceleration off the line. The Rad will be way behind. I’ve done it. Also try the Aventon Pace 500 against the Rad. It would blow this ebike away on power, acceleration, and range too. That would be a REAL review, comparing two ebikes with supposed same ‘ratings’ and specs, to show people the real truth in marketing. Also, mechanical disc brakes on an ebike, should rate no more than a 5 dude. Thats very entry level stuff. You’re review here sort of reminds of of those like Court Rye’s who can’t give anything lower than an 8, even when an ebike absolutely sucks. Aventon pace 500 has HYDRAULIC BRAKES. It deserves a 7 or 8, but based on your scale, should actually be at 11 – again based on you giving the rad an 8. That Rad display is plastic mediocrity, very low level $20 stuff max, and you know it. $200 entire Chinese aftermarket ebike kit level quality display. Its like Rad took an $80 frame, and had the chinese put a $200 aftermarket kit on it. Maybe a 4 rating for the display and wiring. Those thumb shifters do not hold up, and gears will skip easily after a year or two. They should at least use a quality rapid/trigger shifter, especially on an ebike. If you give overall components on this a 7, then Aventon is a 12. Magnum would be a 15 by comparison. No way does Rad deserve a 9 on support. Here’s why. They will drag out the troubleshooting process with anyone who does not identify the root cause, and start by sending you the cheapest part first, which may lead to 6 ‘solutions’ of various parts, days or weeks in between shipping, before they get it right. Meanwhile, you bought all these parts, that did not solve the problems until the last one sent. They sent me 5 parts before they sent the controller, (which I told them from day 1 it was the controller, but they disagreed.) Which according to them was ‘appropriate’ process since it was the most expensive. Wow, a naive customer would have wasted $150 on parts that didn’t need to be replaced before they got the right one that did solve the problem. Also, that controller box is mounted right by the wheel where it will get covered with MUD and water. Its not hermetically sealed, or even Nema rated. The controller connections inside that are NOT Waterproof. Again, aftermarket type chinese kit like very cheap stuff. Personally this comes across as biased toward them, since you do sell uprated parts and power increases for it. Folks, sorry but this is not an objective review. It may be HIS ‘honest’ opinion, but its hardly an objective one. For the price, and the potential risks of it not working when you get it, and then not having any shop nearby that can trouble shoot it, or fix it, for the average consumer, this ebike should rate no more than a 4 or maybe 5 on a scale of 1 to 10. I would suggest this ebike ONLY for those who are VERY handy, and cannot only handle all bike maintenance and repairs, but also savvy with electronics. By it cheap, and use it as a base ebike that will be later on ‘upgraded’ with components, like many DIY’ers do with the Sondors. JMHO, but Reviewers out there on these ebikes need to start outlining all the risks of buying on line. I get more ebikes and consumers into my shop who bought their’s on line (not from me), than I do from my own customers, and I have been selling ebikes for 4 years now. They really regret their decision to do so, especially when they find its a poor fit, or weak power, and generally they only figure that out, after they ride someone else’s and see how great another ebike fits them, and how much more power another ebike has, that only has a 350 watt or 500 watt motor, versus the Rad’s so called ‘750 watt’. They feel frustrated, but they sunk all that money, and now feel stuck with the Rad. Rad honestly is doing the entire market a huge dis-service, by over marketing the motor as being ‘750’ when they know damn well that is a ‘peak power draw’ which many 500 watt motors can achieve. They are misleading people into acting like they are giving ‘more’, when the reality is its much less. A bunch of VC money is coming into this company, and they are shooting for sales of $100 million. With VC’s their gross margins will have to be a minimum of 60%. Thats why they are avoiding dealers. SO this is an ebike, where they can spend no more than $500 to $600 landed cost. Look for them to ‘value engineer’ this even further to maintain those levels of gross margin, absorb the 25% china tariff, and the overhead of $200,000 in google adwords per month, and over 100 employees.

Source

Best Metal Detector Reviews for the Money 2019

Best Metal Detector Reviews for the Money 2019

​5. ​Tesoro Silver uMax Metal Detector

It is the best quality metal detector made in the USA. The quality is superior to most of the metal detectors available in the same price range. It is lightweight and contains an eight-inch long search coil.

Product Highlights

Tesoro Silver uMax Metal Detector contains one drop-in 9-volt battery. It can last for a long period of time. Sometimes, the time span can vary depending on the use and type of metals being detected. It comes with an eight-inch long search coil which makes it more adequate to detect the deeper hidden metals. It has two modes of operation- silent search discrimination mode and a silent search all metal mode.

What’s to Like About Tesoro Silver uMax Metal Detector

It is advertised as “Strong, simple, silent”. Microprocessor technology makes it more efficient. It uses low noise circuitry which works at VLF 10 kHz frequency. It has a built-in mineral rejection system. It is pack with features and its efficient design makes it worth it.

What’s Not to Like About Tesoro Silver uMax Metal Detector

There are not too many cons of this metal detector. The only con of this metal detector is that it comes with a built-in mineral rejection system. This means you don’t have much control over your metal detector. Manual mineral rejection works better.

Metal Detectors Buyer’s Guide

Here are a few things that you need to check before buying a metal detector for yourself.

Detection Depth

The detection depth is basically how deep a metal detector can detect the metals. The coins and other relics can be easily detected by most of the metal detectors. But if you are in search of gold or any other rare metal then, you need to buy a 2-box metal detector. The ground 2-box metal detector uses special search coils that can penetrate deep into the ground.

Type

There is a wide range of metal detectors available in the market today. Some of them are specially designed for the beginners like Bounty Hunter TK4 tracker, Fisher 22 metal detector, etc. Whereas there are some metal detectors designed for the professionals.

For example, Garrett AT Pro, Fisher F2, Ace 350 Garrett metal detector, etc. So, you have to choose which one is suitable for you. This is one aspect of selecting a metal detector. The other aspect is what type of metal you are looking for. If you are in search of gold then there are some metal detectors designed for gold hunting like Fisher Gold Bug, Garrett AT Gold and Garrett ATX.

Selecting a metal detector based on the requirements makes the detection process much easier.

Battery

Almost every metal detector is charged with battery. You need to buy a pack of rechargeable batteries before going for the detection process.

Signal Frequency

In the case of metal detecting, the signal frequency is termed as the number of electronic waves sent in the ground per unit time. The frequency of various metal detectors can vary from 3 KHz to 100 KHz.

Generally, low frequency has a longer wavelength and can penetrate deep into the ground. Low-frequency metal detectors are best for detecting metals which have high conductivity like silver. On the other hand, high frequency comes with a short wavelength. Therefore, the metal detectors that have high frequency are best for detecting low conductive metals like gold nuggets.

Gross Weight

You need to consider the weight of the metal detector as you have to roam around in various locations while holding it. The metal detectors that are designed for adults are around two pounds. On the other hand, there are some hand-held metal detectors used for security purposes. They are of one pound or less. So, now you have to decide whether you want functionality or portability.

Metal Detectors FAQs

You might have some questions regarding metal detectors. Here are the most asked questions for you.

What is a Metal Detector?

A metal detector is a fascinating electronic device that can detect the presence of metals buried into the ground. The search coil of the metal detector is moved slowly over the ground without touching it. When the sensor comes near a metal an audio signal is produced which can be heard in the headphones. There are a variety of metal detectors available from beginner to advanced level.

How do Metal Detectors Work?

The working of metal detectors is based on the principle of electromagnetic induction. When the metal detector is turned on, current is passed through the search coil. This current produces its own magnetic field around the search coil of a metal detector. Then, the search coil is moved over the ground slowly without touching it. When this magnetic field comes in contact with the metal, it induces the current in it.

This current is called an eddy current. This eddy current generates its own magnetic field in the metal. Due to this magnetic field, the reverse current is passed through the search coil. The audio signal is received which can be heard in the headphones that come with the metal detector. In this way, the presence of any metal is detected by the metal detector.

How Deep Can Metal Detectors Detect?

A number of factors affect the depth detection of a metal detector. The length of the search coil can affect how deeply a metal detector can sense the presence of a metal. Metal detectors come with different lengths of search coils.

Operating Frequency is another factor that can affect depth detection. The metal detectors which have low frequency can detect the deeply buried metals. Whereas, the metal detectors which have high frequency can detect the metals up to few inches.

What Type of Metals Can A Metal Detector Detect?

The metal detectors can detect almost all types of metals like coins, jewellery and other relics like brass and lead. There are some metal detectors which are specially designed for hunting small gold nuggets. The metal detector can easily sense the fine iron particles on the ground. So, always adjust the settings in order to get rid of the unwanted signals.

What is A Good Metal Detector?

A good metal detector is the one which can work efficiently in all the harsh weather conditions. There are some metal detectors which can work only on land. There are some that can work accurately on both land and water. So, you need to pick the one which is user-friendly, accurate, portable and waterproof.

What are False Signals?

False signals are basically those which are generated from trash and other fine iron particles. These false signals can be an interference in the metal detecting process.  So, to avoid these false signals the users use the ground balance feature of metal detectors. The ground balance feature filters out all the false signals hence making the detection process more accurate.

How does Discrimination Work?

Mostly all the metal detectors have the discrimination mode. Discrimination mode is used to eliminate all the junk and iron particles from the metals. This mode is turned on when the user is looking for a specific metal.

Final Verdict

So, there is a wide range of metals detectors that you can choose from. You need to select the one which is perfect for you according to your requirements. The best product from all the metal detectors mentioned in the above list is the Garrett AT Pro metal detector. The primary reason for selecting this one is that it is waterproof. You can go hunting on beaches and in any wet area. It can withstand all the extreme conditions as well. It is perfect for detecting old coins, jewelry, relics and other artifacts. This metal detector offers you pro audio mode with fast track ground balance.

If you are looking for an all-rounder metal detector then, this is the best pick for you.

Source

Treasure hunting with Metal Detector…

Treasure hunting with Metal Detector…

I wanted to know if anyone has a metal detector for treasure hunting. I’m getting a metal detector tomorrow for Father’s Day. I’m so excited, but, I just wanted to know if it’s okay to use with a pacemaker. If you have any information to share with me, I would be happy to hear it. May you all your blessings come to pass.
What a treasure it was to find this web site. I’m happy to report that I’m hanging in there and things are looking up. I hope everyone finds a peace of treasure in their heart and share it with the world. I miss you all and may you have a great summer.

Your buddy,

ChristMMPace
James

Source

The Many Faces of Treasure Hunting

The Many Faces of Treasure Hunting

THE COLOR OF GOLD IS:CHANGING!

Changing to the color of—- toy lead soldiers, diecast toy cars, aluminum and brass tokens, plated toy rings, antique bottles even common painted steel bottle caps are sought after by some collectors!
I recall from my early days of metal detecting just how it felt seeing that unmistakable round ‘coin shape’ in the ground. I would lift the freshly detected object from its earthen grave and brush the loose dirt away — how disappointing to find nothing more than a stupid token—- DARN!
How things have changed! Today the “average token” out values the “average coin,” not to mention the token is far more interesting! Oh, and how about those toy rings! Remember how you handled those gold ring finds so gently yet ‘tossed’ plated toy rings into that box of interesting ‘ junk’? Perhaps you can recall giving a “Mickey Mouse” ring, to the child who followed you all over the beach, just because he or she was so cute?
Do you realize the biggest, best diamond, ruby or sapphire ring that you find mounted in a huge slab of gold won’t even come close to the value of a $100,000 toy ‘Super Man Club of America’ toy ring! We need to learn the new and many faces of treasure hunting!

Source

Metal Detecting For Gold

Metal Detecting For Gold

Metal detecting for gold nuggets can be fun AND profitable! If you hunt for gold nuggets with a metal detector, this is YOUR forum, feel free to post your best finds, talk about the best areas to hunt (if you want!) or just about anything else related to searching for gold nuggets with a metal detector.

Forum: Metal Detecting For Gold

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A Guide to Metal-Detecting in Florida: The Thrill of the Hunt

A Guide to Metal-Detecting in Florida: The Thrill of the Hunt

By Lauren Tjaden

Metal detecting in Florida isn’t all about unearthing gold rings encrusted with diamonds – though that’s an exciting possibility. Instead, it’s about the thrill of the hunt, wondering what’s buried under the sand, whether it’s a button, a buckle, or a coin.

It’s about strolling along a stretch of beach, swinging your detector, listening for a beep or click while you enjoy the day. It’s about connecting with the past on a personal level.

Florida offers metal-detecting adventures in all corners of the state. Here’s your guide for places to hunt for treasure, connecting with metal-detecting clubs, adhering to the code of ethics, and more.
 

GEARING UP

If you’re buying a metal detector, you’ve got a lot of options. Simple metal detectors cost as little as $100; super-sensitive models exceed a whopping $1,000. One of the more popular types for a saltwater environment involves pulse induction detectors, like the Garrett Infinium. A set of headphones helps block out extraneous noise so you can quickly detect the increased sound level when the detector head sweeps over something metallic. If you don’t know what you want, or what you need, check with the locals at one of the Florida clubs; they’re sure to have an abundance of advice.

If you want to rent a metal detector, you can find them in most areas with a simple Google search.
 

GETTING THE GOODS

Once you’re equipped, here are some hints for successful searching…

On the grid

Many treasure hunters find the most success by being methodical. You can mentally grid an area and work it slowly, taking one step per sweep of the metal detector in front of you as you hold it just above the sand. Depending on the quality of the detector and the buried metal object, you can find things as small as a dime 12 inches below the surface. Larger objects or those buried a long time that emanate a metallic “halo” effect can be dug up several feet down.

High tide

Another tip is to look for the high-tide line where the sand is softest and walk along it, as that’s frequently productive. Sort through the debris and inspect anything unusual. A screened device at the end of a handle can reduce a lot of stooping, but simple garden tools, such as a hand scoop or pail, will suffice.

Stormy weather

When it’s safe to do so, hit the beach soon after a storm’s come through off the ocean. The heavy wave action stirs up the sediment and at times picks up objects, like coins, and tumbles them right onto the beaches.

Shell’s bells

Look for areas with more shell deposits than others, as this might indicate where strong currents are sweeping across the bottom and depositing loose objects onto the beach sand.

The early bird gets the ring

In popular metal-detecting areas, other enthusiasts will be out at daybreak, so make sure you’re among the initial searchers.

sunset over the waves at Boca Grande

Florida State Parks are glorious, encompassing vast beaches, forests and natural areas — and using metal detectors in them is allowed, at least in certain designated areas.

– Lauren Tjaden for VISIT FLORIDA

WHERE TO GO, WHERE NOT TO GO

Knowing where you’re allowed to hunt — or not — is at least as important as knowing how to do it. Nobody wants to get a ticket, or worse, have their equipment confiscated.

Rules and regulations are complicated, and vary from location to location. Read on to discover where metal-detecting is allowed and prohibited.

Overall, remember that objects more than 50 years old are state property and are illegal to retrieve by private operators. Forget the waters adjacent to national parks; they’re off limits, period.
 

Take a stroll in the park

Florida State Parks are glorious, encompassing vast beaches, forests and natural areas — and using metal detectors in them is allowed, at least in certain designated areas.  At coastal parks, you can hunt between the waterline and toe of the dune, as determined by park managers. The exception is at archaeological sites.

Metal detectors may also be used during authorized archaeological research projects, and to recover lost personal items, with supervision of a park staff member.  

But always check with the park of your choice for details. Rules can change and are different at different parks.

For example, Little Talbot Island State Park, located in northeast Florida, allows metal-detecting currently but they used to allow it only in a restricted area. You don’t even need a permit; they just ask you stay off the dunes.

Here’s where you can find parks and contact information.
 

But not these parks

National Parks, Monuments, Seashores and lands in Florida don’t allow metal detecting. In fact, per the Code of Federal Regulations, “Possessing or using a mineral or metal detector, magnetometer, side scan sonar, other metal detecting device, or subbottom profiler” is prohibited in all national parks.”

This means you can’t even bring a metal detector into a National Park, much less use it.
 

Where metal-detecting is allowed, by area

The following list (which is not comprehensive) helps to target where metal-detecting is allowed – and prohibited – all over Florida. Remember to check before you go to make sure rules and regulations haven’t changed, and be careful not to stray onto private property, military areas or National Parks.

If you don’t find the area in which you’re interested on the list, a county’s division of parks and recreation is usually the best source to find out the rules.
 

North Florida

  • Emerald Coast CVB, Inc./Okaloosa County Tourist Development Council | 850-651-7131
    Metal-detecting is permitted on the beaches, and no permit is required. As always, stay off of the dunes and follow the code of ethics.
  • Panama City Beach Convention & Visitors Bureau, Inc. | 850-233-5070
    Metal-detecting is permitted on the beaches, and no permit is required. However, no metal shovels are allowed, and no holes bigger than two feet.
  • Visit Pensacola | 850-434-1234
    Metal-detecting is permitted on the beaches. However, be aware of crossing into National Parks, where metal detecting is prohibited, and also military installations, which will have their own regulations.
  • Visit South Walton | 850-267-1216
    Metal-detecting is permitted on public beaches.
  • Visit Gainesville | 352-374-5260, 352 264 6868
    For all intents and purposes, you can’t metal-detect in this area’s county parks. While metal-detecting is technically permitted, you can’t remove an item or disturb the ground, which means you can’t do anything except determine that something might be in the ground.
  • Visit Tallahassee | 850-606-2305
    For all intents and purposes, you can’t metal-detect in this area’s county parks. While metal-detecting is technically permitted, you can’t disturb the ground, which means you can’t dig.
  • Amelia Island Convention & Visitors Bureau | 904-277-4369
    Metal-detecting is permitted on public beaches.
  • Visit Jacksonville | 904-798-9111
    Metal-detecting is permitted on public beaches.
  • St. Augustine, Ponte Vedra & The Beaches Visitors & Convention Bureau | 904-829-1711
    Metal-detecting is permitted on all St. Johns County Beaches, but the areas’ visitors services reminds folks it’s not allowed in Anastasia State Park, Fort Matanzas National Park, or the Guana Tolomato Matanzas National Estuarine Research Reserve.
  • Flagler County Tourism Development Council | 386-437-0106
    There are no restrictions for using a metal detector on the beaches. However, particularly during turtle nesting season, remember to fill in any holes you make.

Central Florida

  • Visit St. Petersburg/Clearwater | 727-464-7200
    In Pinellas County Parks the use of metal detectors is prohibited, except on the beach.
    Metal detectors are permitted on Clearwater Beach’s public beaches.
  • Citrus County Visitors and Convention Bureau | 352-628-9305
    Metal-detecting is permitted, and no permit is required. Please don’t leave holes.
  • Ocala/Marion County Visitors & Convention Bureau | 352-291-9169
    Metal-detecting is allowed, but a permit is required. Here’s where you can apply for the permit as well as rules and regulations: www.marioncountyfl.org/home/showdocument?id=11808
  • Visit Orlando | 407-363-5800
    In Orange County, where Orlando is located, metal-detecting is allowed with a permit, but anything you find must be reported to park staff. If whatever you’ve found is a historical artifact, lost or stolen, the staff will confiscate it. Here’s where you can apply for a permit in Orange County.
  • Florida’s Space Coast Office of Tourism | 321-637-5483
    Metal-detecting is permitted in Brevard County Parks, but not in or near playgrounds or athletic fields, or on endangered lands. Here is a list of parks: www.brevardfl.gov/ParksRecreation
  • Daytona Beach Area CVB | 386-255-0415
    Metal-detecting is permitted on the beaches but not inland in any Volusia County park, which includes Daytona Beach, New Smyrna Beach, and West Volusia.
  • New Smyrna Beach Visitor Bureau | 386-428-1600
    Metal-detecting is permitted on the beaches but not inland in any Volusia County park, which includes Daytona Beach, New Smyrna Beach, and West Volusia.
  • Martin County Convention & Visitors Bureau |772-288-5434
    Metal-detecting is permitted; however, removing natural elements from parks and beaches is prohibited. As always, fill in any holes you create.
  • Indian River County Chamber of Commerce Tourism Division | 770-567-3491
    Metal-detecting is permitted; however, removing natural elements from parks and beaches along with excavations is prohibited. Digging in the sand with anything larger than a small scoop or hand trowel isn’t allowed, and of course, fill in your holes. Visitor are reminded to stay off of the dunes and to never to disturb turtle nests.

South Florida

  • Bradenton Area Convention & Visitors Bureau | 941-729-9177
    In Manatee County, which includes Anna Maria Island, metal-detecting is not permitted at preserves and parks. On the beaches, ordinances prohibit digging and removal of objects, which rules out metal-detecting. However, Parks and Recreation say they generally overlook metal-detecting on the beach as long as the operator is practicing good etiquette.
  • Beaches of Fort Myers and Sanibel | 239-338-3500
    Metal-detecting is permitted on Lee County beaches.
  • Naples, Marco Island, Everglades CVB | 239-252-2384
    In Collier County, metal-detecting is allowed at beach parks, but not inland parks. Here’s a list of their parks: www.colliercountyfl.gov/your-government/divisions-f-r/parks-and-recreation/beaches-and-boats .  Parks and Recreation asks that you follow good metal-detecting etiquette.
    In Everglades National Park, metal detecting or even the possession of a metal detector isn’t permitted.
  • Charlotte Harbor & The Gulf Islands Visitor’s Bureau | 941-743-1900
    Metal-detecting is allowed at Englewood and the area’s public beaches.
  • Visit Sarasota County | 941-955-0991
    Metal-detecting is permitted on Sarasota County beaches, but they note you may not ‘Harmfully disturb or remove from any area, or the waters thereof, any buildings, structures, facilities, cultural resources, including historic and prehistoric, equipment, park property, soil, natural water bottom formation, sand, gravel, rocks, stones, fossils, minerals, plants (including terrestrial, aquatic, marine, or epiphytic plants) or animals, artifacts, or other materials.’
  • Greater Fort Lauderdale Convention & Visitors Bureau | 954-767-2466
    In Broward County parks, digging holes is prohibited, so metal-detecting is by default not permitted.
  • Monroe County Tourist Development Council | 1-800-FLA-KEYS
    Metal-detecting is permitted.
  • Greater Miami Convention & Visitors Bureau | 305-539-3040
    Metal-detecting is not permitted.
  • Discover the Palm Beaches | 800-554-7256
    Metal-detecting is permitted in Palm Beach County. The division of parks stresses that you must leave areas in the same condition that you found them, without holes or disturbance.
     
Out of the water…

In general, stay out the water, whether it’s salt or fresh water. On the beach, all lands below the mean high-water line are state sovereignty submerged lands. That even means wet sands.

Remember that objects more than 50 years old are state property and are illegal to retrieve by private operators. Forget the waters adjacent to national parks; they’re off limits, period.
 

Privately speaking

If you can get permission to enter private property to metal-detect, it’s an excellent choice. Permission can be either verbal or in a written. One caveat: if the property encompasses a known or registered archaeology, historical or Native American burial site, they will be off-limits to metal detecting.

a sand sifter resting on the beach, used in metal detecting

A sand sifter will make digging much easier.

– Doug Kelly for VISIT FLORIDA

FINDERS KEEPERS — SOMETIMES

You can keep it!

If you find a bracelet or watch buried in the sand, you can probably keep it. The exceptions are parks that stipulate you have to report anything you find (like Orange County’s, where Orlando is located). At those parks, if someone has lost what you’ve found, you may have to return it.

Leave it be and report it

Older, historically important items are a different story – and anything 50 years or older is considered archaeological. If you find items that might fit that description on state property, they are owned by the state of Florida, and you need to leave them in place and report them.

To report a find, contact the Division of Historical Resources (DHR) or the Bureau of Archaeological Research (BAR) at 850-245-6444. You can also contact one of the archaeologists at the Florida Department of State by email, listed here dos.myflorida.com/historical/about/staff-people-programs/.

The same is true on city and county properties; archaeological finds should be left in place and reported.
You can report a find at DHR, BAR, or the city/county historic preservation office.

Even on non-state lands, most cities and counties have provisions in their charters that protect and preserve archaeological sites, so if whatever you find is 50 years or older, follow the same simple rule: leave it be and report it.

 If you find human remains on any property, anywhere in Florida, you have to report them immediately to law enforcement, the district medical examiner, and/or the state archaeologist. Any objects associated with remains should be left undisturbed and in place too, as stipulated by Florida law.

TEAM UP

Florida metal detecting clubs offer a wealth of knowledge, including laws and regulations, as well as fellowship with other treasure-hunting enthusiasts.

·         Suncoast Research & Recovery Club, St. Petersburg – www.srarc.com/index.php

·         Central Florida Metal Detecting Club, Sanford (central Florida) – www.thecfmdc.com/

·         Gold Coast Treasure Club, West Palm Beach (southeast Florida) – www.apex-ephemera.com/gctc/

·         Treasure Coast Archeological Society Inc., Sebastian (central east Florida) – www.tcas.us/

·         Dig & Find Coinshooters & Historical Club, Daytona Beach (central east Florida) – www.digandfind.com/index.html

·         South Florida Treasure Hunters Club, Hollywood (southeast Florida)- soflatreasurehunters.tripod.com/

ETHICS

Metal detecting has a Code of Ethics.  Here’s how you can be a positive ambassador of the hobby, protecting it for the future.

·         I will respect private property and will not metal-detect without the property owner’s permission.

·         I will not destroy property, buildings or what is left of ghost towns and deserted structures.  I will not tamper with equipment or posted signs.

·         I will not litter, I will always pack out what I take in and remove all trash found.  I will only build fires in designated or safe areas.

·         I will leave all gates and other accesses to land as I found them.

·         I will not damage natural resources, wildlife habitats, or any private property.

·         I will use thoughtfulness, consideration and courtesy at all times.

·         I will abide by all laws, ordinances or regulations that may govern my search, or the area I will be in.

·         I will fill all holes, regardless how remote the location, and never dig in a way that will damage, be damaging to, or kill any vegetation.

·         I will report the discovery of items of significant historical value to a local historian or museum in
accordance with the latest legislation.  I will report to the proper authorities any individuals who remove artifacts from federal parks or state preserves.

·         I will be an ambassador for the metal detecting hobby.

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