Browsed by
Author: becauseican

RV Electric Mattress Warming Pad

RV Electric Mattress Warming Pad









Mod #50: Electric Mattress Warming Pad












Mod #50: Electric Mattress Warming Pad











Share your experiences and connect with others who’ve actually done what’s described in this mod. If that’s YOU, click the “I Did This Mod!” button. See the FAQ for more information on this very cool feature!


Congratulations! You’ve “Done the Mod”. You should see your gravatar displayed in all it’s glory over in the sidebar. Don’t have a gravatar? Visit www.gravatar.com and sign up for one. It’s free and once you do, your new gravatar
will appear in the sidebar and in the comments you make on any mod. See the FAQ for more information.



Mod Description:

Turn down the heater. You’re roasting me out of here! Turn up the heater. It’s so cold in here I can see my breath! Give me more blankets. Fine! Take all you want. He’s hot and she’s cold. Sound familiar? One thing that can be agreed on though is that an RV heater can dry your nose and throat out faster than a desert sandstorm. How can you sleep in your own relative comfort and at the same time save the peace? Do the electric mattress warming pad mod!

Mod Difficulty:

An electric mattress warming pad is different than an electric blanket. You sleep on top of the mattress pad rather than the blanket being on top of you. This has the effect of heating the mattress rather than having most of the heat generated by an electric blanket go to waste as it radiates in to the air. And you can start warming up the mattress before you get in to bed so you’re not trying to warm up the mattress with your body.

Mattress pad warmers come in two types: 115-volt AC and 12-volt DC. The AC models are fitted sheets that stretch over the mattress while the DC type is pinned to the top of the mattress. For RVs, either type can be used but if you dry camp and don’t have AC power, the 12-volt model will serve you well. It can be plugged in to the typical RV 12-volt receptacle. The 12-volt warmer does draw a bit of current, around 200 watts at the max setting. But chances are you won’t be at that setting for long. Average consumption is about 100 watts so ensure your battery is topped up before hitting the sack.

And there are even warmers that have two separate controllers so you can dial in your own comfort level. A his-and-hers arrangement that sure to keep both camping happy!

TipIf you are powering an AC mattress warmer from an inverter, be sure it is not a modified sine wave (or MSW) type inverter. The digital controllers found on most AC mattress warmers don’t like the MSW power and will refuse to work. A true sine wave inverter must be used instead.

ModMyRV recommends these parts for this mod:
Patented Products T-36 12-Volt 60 x 36 Twin Size Bunk Warmer Pad
Roadpro 58″ x 42.5″ 12-Volt Heated Premium Fleece Travel Blanket with Built-In Thermostat – Blue
Wagan 12V Heated Seat Cushion

Source

Purchase of Cruise America Rental Class C

Purchase of Cruise America Rental Class C

Topic: Purchase of Cruise America Rental Class C




Posted By: Floridastorm
on 02/23/16 12:19pm




This topic may have been addressed a few times. However, I don’t really know how to find the subject in the forum.

Anyway, I’m considering buying one of Cruise America’s Class C motor homes out of the Orlando office since I live just north of Orlando. We looked a couple of years ago and were really undecided about a motor home. We really like the 19G model. But, at that time they were selling for over 40,000. They have now dropped their price to 19,000 to 22,000 for a 2010 model. So, we are now very interested in getting one. I know that they are high mileage ex rental units. However CA gives a 12 month 12,000 mile warranty, for free, right out of the gate. They also have an extended power train warranty for 5 years and 100,000 miles for $1,650. And also an optional coach warranty for 4 years for a few hundred dollars extra.

Would appreciate feedback from any and all that have purchased from Cruise America and whether you also purchased the power train and/or coach protection plans. Are you satisfied with your purchase?




Posted By: IAMICHABOD
on 02/23/16 12:34pm




Check out this thread about Rentals,many happy owners.

Buying a former Rental

2006 TIOGA 26Q CHEVY 6.0 WORKHORSE VORTEC

Former El Monte RV RentalBuying A Rental Class CChevrolet Based Class C




Posted By: IDman
on 02/23/16 05:27pm




Personally, I would not want to buy a rental unit. We have all seen them driving 80 mph, parked in a CG without leveling, etc. I have seen some where the occupant used his black tank spray hose and then hooked it back up to his fresh water, thus contaminating the fresh tank. You just don’t know how it has been abused by renters that 1) don’t know or 2) don’t care how they treat it.




Posted By: DSDP Don
on 02/23/16 06:58pm




Actually, many of them can be in very nice shape. You know the service was completed on a regular basis and repairs as needed. Typically, they don’t come with an awning or hitch, but pretty reasonable to add.

Often, I see many of them just used to transport people versus a van. I wouldn’t have any issues buying one.


Don & Mary

2019 Newmar Dutch Star 4018 – All Electric
2016 GMC Canyon 4WD Crew Cab




Posted By: tlerchba
on 02/23/16 07:59pm




If you are serious at spending that kind of money, I would highly recommend that you contact RV Inspection Connection and arrange for a professional inspection. It will be well worth the expense.


Tim & Leesa, 2013 Ford F250 6.7 Diesel, 2012 Keystone Avalanche.




Posted By: gotsmart
on 02/23/16 08:24pm




I have a CA former rental. See my signature.

The 12 month/12,000 mile warranty is very limited. It explicitly lists the 20 or so parts that are covered by the warranty.

If extended warranties are important to you, You may want to purchase CA’s extended warranty. GoodSam’s extended warranty on motorhomes is limited to 80,000 miles on the odometer. You may be very hard pressed to find a third party warranty for a high mileage motorhome.


2005 Cruise America 28R (Four Winds 28R) on a 2004 Ford E450 SD 6.8L V10 4R100

2009 smart fortwo Passion with Roadmaster “Falcon 2” towbar & tail light kit – pictures




Posted By: DownTheAvenue
on 02/23/16 08:35pm




I would not hesitate buying one of their units. Just be sure you fully understand the warranty and if you feel the need to purchase additional coverage, and then be sure you understand that coverage as well.




Posted By: loggenrock
on 02/23/16 10:15pm




To each their own. I, too, have seen WAAAY to many uneducated CruiseAmerica and other company renters doing unheard of things to rented motorhomes. Tank dumping is usually good for a laugh, but hardly dangerous. The angles they get parked must be taking years of life off the fridges in them. They get driven as if they were stolen – since operators often know very little regarding how to drive a large vehicle. There’s a video out there of a rental unit mired in sand as the operator tried to take it over the dunes. You can hear the engine at red-line rpm’s with wheels spinning in the sand. No thank you. I want something I can count on when I’m trying to enjoy myself miles away from home on the road… ST


Two and a hound in a 2015 Coachmen Prism “B+”…pushed by ’09 Suby Forester

First 50 done, working on the second pass! Nunavut – we’ll see…!
2005-2015 Roadtrek 190P
1993-2005 Northstar Soft-Side TC
1989-1993 Backpacks & Tents!
1967-1977 Family TT’s





Posted By: Jbrowland
on 02/24/16 12:58pm




No offense to any one, but if they haven’t looked at or purchased one, I wouldn’t take their advice too seriously. I have one and it has been amazing. I owe nothing on it. Not many can say that. Moreover, they are in better shape than most one owner, used RV’s I looked at thanks to a major refurb process. These ex-rentals tend to be filled with new to newer parts inside and out thanks to frequent use.

I’ll give you a little buying advice as an owner of a former CA RV. One, they won’t budge much on the price but they will fix and add anything you request before the sale like tires, breaks, or anything else you find wrong with it. I had over 30 items on my list addresses quickly and without complaint and that cost them several thousand. They didn’t drop the price much, but they gave me new breaks, tires, a new $390 battery, new mattresses, radio and much more. Two, don’t buy the warranties. Save the money and spend it when something breaks and it will be it a new or used RV. Nature of the beast. Three, if something breaks or goes wrong within a few months of the sale then take it back and they will fix it. I did twice. Four, spend about 5 or more hours with a check list going over every detail before you leave. Most of these RV’s have front end issues. Take extra time to check on that. Five, drive the heck out of it happily knowing you don’t have a 50k mortgage on it. Six, enjoy the fact that most will be shocked when you pull up in an RV that has 150,000 miles and looks newer than their three year old RV. [emoticon]. Seven, read every page of the thread IAMICHABOD linked to and ignore MUCH of of but not all of the advice from people who have never driven, purchased, or looked at a refurbished RV from CA in person. I say this because before I went to look, I made some terrible assumptions about how bad they would be before going. I read yelp reviews from renters and the reviews were horrific. I assumed my experience would be the same and it wasn’t. I am honestly still a little shocked by this fact and that’s why I took the time to respond here. My experience was stellar. Not perfect, but better than the experience I had on new lots with slimy RV salespeople and with people listing their units online and in the paper.

Buying one of these units is not for everyone. In fact, I would say that it’s only a good option for a small group of people. I would say that it tends to be a good option for cash buyers who are sick of tent camping and want a cheap RV for weekend warrior style use. First time buyers who don’t want or need much.

Here in California, the used RV market barely exists. Not many sell and those who do used the hell out of theirs and want too much money for junk or are under water and want to sell their barely used RV for five bucks less than they paid. For those reasons, buying a CA RV for 19k instead of a new one for 55k or a used one for 49k may be a better option. IMHO, these CA units are good deals at 19k but once you go above 25k then maybe not so much.

That said, you live in Florida where the exact opposite is the case and the used RV market is much better so you must consider that as well.

Good luck and do your due diligence with the sale and you will be fine!


* This post was
last
edited 02/24/16 01:15pm by Jbrowland *




Posted By: Floridastorm
on 02/24/16 02:49pm




Jbrowland wrote:

No offense to any one, but if they haven’t looked at or purchased one, I wouldn’t take their advice too seriously. I have one and it has been amazing. I owe nothing on it. Not many can say that. Moreover, they are in better shape than most one owner, used RV’s I looked at thanks to a major refurb process. These ex-rentals tend to be filled with new to newer parts inside and out thanks to frequent use.

I’ll give you a little buying advice as an owner of a former CA RV. One, they won’t budge much on the price but they will fix and add anything you request before the sale like tires, breaks, or anything else you find wrong with it. I had over 30 items on my list addresses quickly and without complaint and that cost them several thousand. They didn’t drop the price much, but they gave me new breaks, tires, a new $390 battery, new mattresses, radio and much more. Two, don’t buy the warranties. Save the money and spend it when something breaks and it will be it a new or used RV. Nature of the beast. Three, if something breaks or goes wrong within a few months of the sale then take it back and they will fix it. I did twice. Four, spend about 5 or more hours with a check list going over every detail before you leave. Most of these RV’s have front end issues. Take extra time to check on that. Five, drive the heck out of it happily knowing you don’t have a 50k mortgage on it. Six, enjoy the fact that most will be shocked when you pull up in an RV that has 150,000 miles and looks newer than their three year old RV. [emoticon]. Seven, read every page of the thread IAMICHABOD linked to and ignore MUCH of of but not all of the advice from people who have never driven, purchased, or looked at a refurbished RV from CA in person. I say this because before I went to look, I made some terrible assumptions about how bad they would be before going. I read yelp reviews from renters and the reviews were horrific. I assumed my experience would be the same and it wasn’t. I am honestly still a little shocked by this fact and that’s why I took the time to respond here. My experience was stellar. Not perfect, but better than the experience I had on new lots with slimy RV salespeople and with people listing their units online and in the paper.

Buying one of these units is not for everyone. In fact, I would say that it’s only a good option for a small group of people. I would say that it tends to be a good option for cash buyers who are sick of tent camping and want a cheap RV for weekend warrior style use. First time buyers who don’t want or need much.

Here in California, the used RV market barely exists. Not many sell and those who do used the hell out of theirs and want too much money for junk or are under water and want to sell their barely used RV for five bucks less than they paid. For those reasons, buying a CA RV for 19k instead of a new one for 55k or a used one for 49k may be a better option. IMHO, these CA units are good deals at 19k but once you go above 25k then maybe not so much.

That said, you live in Florida where the exact opposite is the case and the used RV market is much better so you must consider that as well.

Good luck and do your due diligence with the sale and you will be fine!

Thank you, sir, for some excellent advice with your CA experience. In perusing the many ads for used motor homes, especially Class C’s, I find that most private sellers and a lot of dealers overprice them quite a bit. Some are completely ridiculous as they probably never even checked the NADA value to get an approximate value. Having already spoken at length with the CA dealership in Orlando, I do know that they completely go over these units and bring them up to standard before selling them. I don’t think they would warranty them for 12 months or 12,000 miles if they did not. On top of that, the extended 5 year warranty is not very expensive. I would want the extended warranty for engine and transmission alone. If either of these systems fails it could cost many times the $1,600 price of the warranty. It’s just my personal preference. People who can do their own repairs may not be interested in the extended warranty. The 19G unit is perfect for my wife and myself. Also, we do need a 2nd car. Something that small can suffice as a 2nd car. So, it fits our situation perfectly. I will use your knowledge to make sure the CA dealer takes care of everything before I roll it off the lot.




Posted By: IAMICHABOD
on 02/24/16 07:06pm




Very good post Jbrowland! Always good to hear from someone that has done what the OP is thinking of doing,with facts and helpful information.[image]

I have seen WAAAY to many uneducated posts on buying a Former Rental.

Floridastorm,Good luck in your quest for that RV. If you do indeed buy from Cruise America please return to the Buying A Rental Class C thread and share how it went and anything else that may be helpful to others that are thinking of buying a Former Rental. [emoticon]




Posted By: Thunder Mountain
on 02/24/16 07:58pm




I have a very good friend that bought a CA former rental. They beat the heck out of it boon docking and road tripping. It worked for them with no problems except for normal wear and tear.


2016 Winnebago Journey 40R

2018 Rubicon
1982 FJ40 Toyota Land Cruiser
2013 Keystone Outback 250RS
2013 Ford F150 FX4 Ecoboost
2 Arctic Cats
Polaris RZR XP 1000
4 Cats
3 Dogs
1 Bottle of Jack Daniels
Two old hippies still trying to find ourselves!




Posted By: Jbrowland
on 02/25/16 12:51am




Floridastorm wrote:

Jbrowland wrote:

No offense to any one, but if they haven’t looked at or purchased one, I wouldn’t take their advice too seriously. I have one and it has been amazing. I owe nothing on it. Not many can say that. Moreover, they are in better shape than most one owner, used RV’s I looked at thanks to a major refurb process. These ex-rentals tend to be filled with new to newer parts inside and out thanks to frequent use.

I’ll give you a little buying advice as an owner of a former CA RV. One, they won’t budge much on the price but they will fix and add anything you request before the sale like tires, breaks, or anything else you find wrong with it. I had over 30 items on my list addresses quickly and without complaint and that cost them several thousand. They didn’t drop the price much, but they gave me new breaks, tires, a new $390 battery, new mattresses, radio and much more. Two, don’t buy the warranties. Save the money and spend it when something breaks and it will be it a new or used RV. Nature of the beast. Three, if something breaks or goes wrong within a few months of the sale then take it back and they will fix it. I did twice. Four, spend about 5 or more hours with a check list going over every detail before you leave. Most of these RV’s have front end issues. Take extra time to check on that. Five, drive the heck out of it happily knowing you don’t have a 50k mortgage on it. Six, enjoy the fact that most will be shocked when you pull up in an RV that has 150,000 miles and looks newer than their three year old RV. [emoticon]. Seven, read every page of the thread IAMICHABOD linked to and ignore MUCH of of but not all of the advice from people who have never driven, purchased, or looked at a refurbished RV from CA in person. I say this because before I went to look, I made some terrible assumptions about how bad they would be before going. I read yelp reviews from renters and the reviews were horrific. I assumed my experience would be the same and it wasn’t. I am honestly still a little shocked by this fact and that’s why I took the time to respond here. My experience was stellar. Not perfect, but better than the experience I had on new lots with slimy RV salespeople and with people listing their units online and in the paper.

Buying one of these units is not for everyone. In fact, I would say that it’s only a good option for a small group of people. I would say that it tends to be a good option for cash buyers who are sick of tent camping and want a cheap RV for weekend warrior style use. First time buyers who don’t want or need much.

Here in California, the used RV market barely exists. Not many sell and those who do used the hell out of theirs and want too much money for junk or are under water and want to sell their barely used RV for five bucks less than they paid. For those reasons, buying a CA RV for 19k instead of a new one for 55k or a used one for 49k may be a better option. IMHO, these CA units are good deals at 19k but once you go above 25k then maybe not so much.

That said, you live in Florida where the exact opposite is the case and the used RV market is much better so you must consider that as well.

Good luck and do your due diligence with the sale and you will be fine!

Thank you, sir, for some excellent advice with your CA experience. In perusing the many ads for used motor homes, especially Class C’s, I find that most private sellers and a lot of dealers overprice them quite a bit. Some are completely ridiculous as they probably never even checked the NADA value to get an approximate value. Having already spoken at length with the CA dealership in Orlando, I do know that they completely go over these units and bring them up to standard before selling them. I don’t think they would warranty them for 12 months or 12,000 miles if they did not. On top of that, the extended 5 year warranty is not very expensive. I would want the extended warranty for engine and transmission alone. If either of these systems fails it could cost many times the $1,600 price of the warranty. It’s just my personal preference. People who can do their own repairs may not be interested in the extended warranty. The 19G unit is perfect for my wife and myself. Also, we do need a 2nd car. Something that small can suffice as a 2nd car. So, it fits our situation perfectly. I will use your knowledge to make sure the CA dealer takes care of everything before I roll it off the lot.

Glad to assist. Hope I didn’t offend anyone. ALL of the folks here have been very helpful at one point or another.

Full disclosure, I bought both warranties but haven’t used them. I have either taken my RV back to CA and they fixed it for free or I figured it out with some help from RV.net. You will be surprised by how much you will learn in a year and how many things can be handled easily yourself. Sometimes putting your rig in the shop for two weeks to fix a small problem isn’t an option. RV shops are always slammed in sunny SoCal. That said, when I have called the warranty company, they have been available, friendly and have always assured me that if I used them that it would be taken care of. The interactions I had with them were a pleasant surprise. I expected the old run around and trouble but again, I was disappointed that I wasn’t disappointed. [emoticon]

I suggest looking at the 23a. Just a little bigger, a queen bed you don’t have to climb up to, and about the same price. The 19 is an awesome little RV and I can see why you like it but I honestly found them to feel a little tipsy and harsh perhaps because of the four wheels and not six. JMHO of course. Honestly they all drive like large boxes on wheels though, lol. Simply horrible machines to drive compared to my Mini Cooper.

Another thing I forgot to mention, ask for a ladder and go up on the roof. Spend about 15 minutes looking for cracks etc…

Here is another tip. Get to know the guy who will be addressing any issues you find and buy him/her lunch any time you go. I did and my new best friend found five more things I missed to the tune of about 1k. A little honest friendship goes a long way. CA has tons of parts laying around for the hundreds of RV’s they service daily. They really don’t mind putting those parts in your RV if they are needed and it makes you happy and you sign the bill of sale. The company is owned by the employees. They don’t give the hard sale. It was kinda weird going from a commercial RV lot to CA. They show you the RV’s but they don’t pressure you. You buy great. You don’t buy okay. It seems every CA lot has one person who handles the selling and a hundred who handle the renting.

I should mention that many people have also been very pleased with El Monte ex-rental purchases. They tend to have less miles but they also tend to cost more. I looked at them but they averaged about 30k and I wanted to stay under 20 used or just buy new so I went back to CA. One positive with El Monte is they supply very detailed maintenance records. CA does not but if you are friendly enough, they will show you the records. [emoticon]

I can’t stress the importance of asking for things you feel the RV needs and being friendly. It’s a different approach than buying hard ball style from the typical lot. I don’t think the sales folks at CA make much on the sales and that shows in their attitude. They aren’t negative, just less desperate to sell you something. I made it clear that this was a ton of money for my family and they seemed to appreciate that concept unlike the salespeople at other RV lots who just seemed interested in taking my money and getting rid of me. When I asked what happens if this breaks the answer was always to bring it back and they would fix it. And when it did break, Ibrought it back and they fixed it. I hope you have the same experience. Good luck!

Btw, both me and the wife are former Floridians and both FS Seminoles. [emoticon]

—Jason


* This post was
last
edited 02/25/16 01:29am by Jbrowland *




Posted By: Floridastorm
on 05/17/16 12:10pm




Have been away from this forum for quite sometime and never got to review your latest post. Have still not bought a motor home as I have been busy with other things. Am now, once again, in the market. And yes, I have checked out El Monte. They seem to be a very reliable outfit as is Cruise America. Let’s face it, both of these companies have been in the RV rental and sales business for many successful years.

I have also been looking at used Class C’s and even small Class A’s from private sources. Nothing over 26 feet. There seem to be many Class A’s out there and for decent pricing. The Class C’s seem to be fewer and more expensive. Also, the pricing for Cruise America and El Monte Class C’s have gone up by about 25% since I last looked at them. Maybe I should have bought one then. I am really torn between getting a few years old Class C from a private individual and paying cash as opposed to purchasing one of the ex-rental units and having payments over the next 12 years or so. With an older Class C I will not be able to obtain an extended service agreement which will leave me open to paying for repairs out of my pocket. With the ex rental unit I will at least have an extended service agreement and a newer unit. I would never attempt to fix most things on a motor home myself. Retired executive who can’t hammer a nail straight. I guess it’s a “pay me now or pay me later” scenario.




Posted By: B.O. Plenty
on 05/17/16 06:15pm




DSDP Don wrote:

Actually, many of them can be in very nice shape. You know the service was completed on a regular basis and repairs as needed. Typically, they don’t come with an awning or hitch, but pretty reasonable to add.

Often, I see many of them just used to transport people versus a van. I wouldn’t have any issues buying one.

Don’t put too much faith in the “serviced regularly” part. I was a manager for a large auto rental company for several years. We changed oil on the entire fleet (1800 cars during our peak season) twice a year. Some had 500 miles on them some had 15,000 miles on them. We weren’t any different than any of our competitors. The cars all were under warranty, it would cost us money to pull them out of service to fix anything. If it was usable we rented it and let the next owner worry about it. It’s all about cash flow. I bet rental RVs aren’t treated any differently..

B.O.


Former Ram/Cummins owner

2015 Silverado 3500 D/A DRW
Yup I’m a fanboy!
2016 Cedar Creek 36CKTS




Posted By: Jbrowland
on 05/18/16 01:27am




Floridastorm wrote:

Have been away from this forum for quite sometime and never got to review your latest post. Have still not bought a motor home as I have been busy with other things. Am now, once again, in the market. And yes, I have checked out El Monte. They seem to be a very reliable outfit as is Cruise America. Let’s face it, both of these companies have been in the RV rental and sales business for many successful years.

I have also been looking at used Class C’s and even small Class A’s from private sources. Nothing over 26 feet. There seem to be many Class A’s out there and for decent pricing. The Class C’s seem to be fewer and more expensive. Also, the pricing for Cruise America and El Monte Class C’s have gone up by about 25% since I last looked at them. Maybe I should have bought one then. I am really torn between getting a few years old Class C from a private individual and paying cash as opposed to purchasing one of the ex-rental units and having payments over the next 12 years or so. With an older Class C I will not be able to obtain an extended service agreement which will leave me open to paying for repairs out of my pocket. With the ex rental unit I will at least have an extended service agreement and a newer unit. I would never attempt to fix most things on a motor home myself. Retired executive who can’t hammer a nail straight. I guess it’s a “pay me now or pay me later” scenario.

The prices at CA and El Monte do vary drastically depending on their inventory. I have seen them as low as 19k and as high as almost 40k at CA.

Regarding fixing things on an RV, I have a degree in musical theater. If I can learn to fix stuff on an RV, you can too. I have replaced all of my lights with LED, replaced switches and performed my own oil change on my generator, have learned about replacing tires and then replaced them, have replaced the entire left power window mirror, fixed my toilet, fixed my furnace, installed a bike rack to my rear hitch, have sealed roof and my RV door window, have replaced my stereo, and more and all with the help I got here. You will be surprised at how easy it is The nice folks here will always help you out.




Posted By: Floridastorm
on 05/23/16 02:49pm




Unfortunately, I have a degree in “not being able to repair mechanical things myself”. It’s hard to change to a handyman at my age. Imagine there may be a couple of things I could do myself. However, most I would not have a clue about. I am just wondering how successful people like myself are in buying an older motor home that is in relatively good shape at purchase and in being able to maintain it without spending a fortune on upkeep. Before purchase would it be advantageous to hire a reputable private RV inspector to insure that, at least, it is in pretty good shape?

By the way, I do have a Music Education Degree from Berklee College. Doesn’t make me smart. Just makes me able to frame it and put it on my desk.

inspector to go over the motor home




Posted By: Jbrowland
on 05/24/16 12:53am




Floridastorm wrote:

Unfortunately, I have a degree in “not being able to repair mechanical things myself”. It’s hard to change to a handyman at my age. Imagine there may be a couple of things I could do myself. However, most I would not have a clue about. I am just wondering how successful people like myself are in buying an older motor home that is in relatively good shape at purchase and in being able to maintain it without spending a fortune on upkeep. Before purchase would it be advantageous to hire a reputable private RV inspector to insure that, at least, it is in pretty good shape?

By the way, I do have a Music Education Degree from Berklee College. Doesn’t make me smart. Just makes me able to frame it and put it on my desk.

Yes, I would hire someone to do an inspection on anything you might buy. There is also a very good pre-purchase inspection check list online somewhere that is about 40 pages long. That, combined with a fairly mechanical father-in-law, I was able to find several things that needed to be addressed before I purchased my used RV from CA.

My current RV is my first. We have had it for about 18 months now. It has changed our lives for the better as a family. That said, I have to admit that although I knew I would have to spend either time or money on things thy would break, I never knew there would be so many little things that would need to be addressed for one reason or another. Luckily, my troubles were all easy fixes that I was able to research and fix myself. Most RV technicians around here charge $100 an hour.

So yeah, things will break and go wrong and an RV will cost you money so plan on it. Even many of the RV’ers with brand new RV’s complain about something that just stopped working in their rig.

inspector to go over the motor home





Posted By: aruba5er
on 05/25/16 08:35am




years ago (1986) I bought a rental that had 34k on and it was made only 8 months before I bought it. I drove it for 19 years before I gave it to my daughter to use. It’s still going with almost 200k on the clock. It was in better shape when I got it than the fiver I bought to replace it. The rental had no issues that needed attention verus 17 in the new Fiver. I needed a new truck at the time (2004) and decided to get a fiver and reduce the insurance and liscense fee’s. but if I where in the market for a drivable RV I would check for a rental first.




Posted By: Floridastorm
on 05/25/16 10:55am




I’ve been doing some mathematical figuring and this is what I have come up with,

In most cases the more expensive and newer your motor home is the more you will lose in value proportionally if and when you go to sell it. This involves natural depreciation, from new or near new, to older and used.

In most cases the less expensive and older your motor home is the less you will lose proportionally in value if and when you go to sell it. Natural depreciation has basically ended at a given point in the motor home cycle.

Naturally, we’re considering that both motor homes are maintained properly.

It seems that there is a point in a motor home’s life where it stops losing value and you can sell it, years later, for the same price you bought it for. So, in a sense buying an older motor home in good condition is an investment where the only expenses will be the upkeep.

It’s also why a former rental is a good investment as most of the depreciation has been already attained.

Of course this does not apply in every case. I imagine there are some motor homes, when bought new, that do not lose a great deal of value. Possibly a Bluebird or Airstream.

Am I totally incorrect about this assessment?




Posted By: 71chevelle
on 06/17/16 06:08pm




Hello, great thread and the reason for my purchase of a 2009 Ranger 25G with 125,000 miles on it today. I bought it from El Monte in Dublin Ca. The salesman was great to deal with and the few small things I found were fixed no problem.
I got the maintenance records and they were extensive and one of the main reasons for going for it. I can’t get the tv to turn on with the antenna so I’m not sure what the deal is there but I’m going to Mendocino next week for a week of abalone diving and fishing so I’ll get a chance to really check this baby out. I’ll check back in after and share how she did.




Posted By: TXiceman
on 06/18/16 06:55pm




I would never buy a rental RV unit. They are treated rough and used by too many inexperienced users.

Ken


Amateur Radio Operator.

2013 HitchHiker 38RLRSB Champagne, toted with a 2012, F350, 6.7L PSD, Crewcab, dually. 3.73 axle, Full Time RVer.
Travel with a standard schnauzer and a Timneh African Gray parrot




Posted By: dms1
on 11/06/16 02:40am




I bought a 2000 Cruise America RV in 2003,and I still have it today. I bought it because of the warranty and the cost was price competitive with comparable private party RVs for sale at the time. I never needed to use the warranty and all of the appliances still work to this day. I just this month had to coat the rubber roof with EPDM because the rubber roof had several cracks and most of the white coating was gone, but I don’t think that is cruise americas fault, just old age.

I love my RV and would buy another one from cruise america.


Dave S

2000 Fleetwood Tioga 22C




Posted By: WeBeFulltimers
on 11/06/16 07:00am




My son’s in-laws bought a rental and the only problem I had with it was NO SLIDE OUTS. Very cramped inside but they did not buy it for me. Not sure if it was a CA rental or some other one. They have been very happy with it for about 3 years.

2012 Ford F-350 PSD SRW ** CURT Q24 ** 2018.5 MONTANA 3791RD




Posted By: spoon059
on 11/06/16 07:07am




The amount of money that you will save by buying a 6 year old used rig will be more than enough to fix anything that might be damaged. Do a thorough walk through and know what you are buying. Spend the money and have a professional inspection done so you aren’t surprised by too much.

Good luck and let us know what you do!


2015 Ram CTD

2015 Jayco 29QBS



Source

Free RV Camping in Florida

Free RV Camping in Florida

Florida has hundreds of RV sites, many of them free.

Florida has hundreds of RV sites, many of them free. (Photo: Streamlined Motor Homes image by K. Geijer from Fotolia.com )

Many a traveler hits the road in the winter, bound for the warm promise of the Sunshine State. Florida is a great place to bum around in an RV, especially during the colder months of the year when prime camping weather is hard to come by farther north. The trouble is, traveling by RV can be costly, especially if you end up staying in commercial campgrounds every night. Luckily, Florida offers an abundance of free RV camping options.

Free Camping on Public Land

Public lands offer arguably the best option for campers in search of a free RV site. Wildlife Management Areas and Water Management Areas – which are operated by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, respectively – offer hundreds of free RV campsites across the state. Both these organizations offer useful online resources for finding and reserving a campsite.

  • Wildlife Management Areas: More than a dozen Wildlife Management Areas across the state of Florida offer free campsites. Many areas are open to RVs, while others are tents-only, and the accommodations are typically primitive. Some sites are available by reservation, but most are first-come, first-served. A free camping permit can be obtained by calling the regional office in which a specific Wildlife Management Area is located.
  • Water Management Areas: Florida is divided into five regional Water Management Districts. Each district oversees numerous Water Management Areas, many of which offer free camping. You can use each district’s website to explore options for specific campgrounds and recreation areas, including online reservations and a list of amenities in each area. Some Water Management Areas offer more developed camping facilities, including restrooms, showers and drinking water, while others are entirely primitive.

Florida’s three National Forests (Ocala, Osceola and Apalachicola) offer free dispersed backcountry camping, a practice that is generally better suited to tent camping than RV-ing. It’s not unheard of for RV campers to find a place to park for the night in a National Forest, but it’s wise not to count on it. Florida’s National Forests also offer paid RV campgrounds that include amenities like electrical hookups, dump stations, drinking water and restrooms.

Other Camping Options

Although it may not be the most scenic or glamorous option, some businesses allow RV campers to park in their parking lots overnight. Walmart is probably the best known, but Cracker Barrel is also known for being RV-friendly and has locations all over Florida. Keep in mind that, while these businesses are generally open to overnight RV parking, specific stores may have restrictions due to space availability or local ordinances.

If you plan on staying in the parking lot of a Walmart or other business, call ahead to make sure that particular store allows overnight RV parking. And although it’s a fairly common practice to park overnight at interstate rest areas, Florida Department of Transportation rules technically limit rest area visits to three hours.

Know Before You Go

Florida is a popular destination for RV campers, especially in winter. Snowbirds flock to the state’s parks and campgrounds in droves, which can make finding a free place to park your RV a real challenge. Always have a backup plan in case a free campsite you were looking for turns out to be full. Websites like Campendium and Freecampsites.net are useful resources for finding free campsites, but any information found there should be taken with a grain of salt. These sites are largely based on user-submitted information, so it’s always wise to double-check before making concrete plans.

About the Author

Richard Corrigan has been a full-time freelance writer since 2009, and has always considered himself lucky to be able to combine his passion for travel with his love of writing. His work has appeared online on USA TODAY Travel, LIVESTRONG.com, AZCentral and 10Best.com.

Leaf Group is a USA TODAY content partner providing general travel information. Its content is produced independently of USA TODAY.

Photo Credits

  • Streamlined Motor Homes image by K. Geijer from Fotolia.com

Source

A Small Motorhome Is Your Best Choice

A Small Motorhome Is Your Best Choice





























We drive a small motorhome – a Class B (van size) camper. Pictured here, our
1990 Roadtrek offers everything we need in an RV in a very compact space.


Our 1990 Roadtrek camped at Wind Cave NP, South Dakota




Our home away from home. We named her


“Sweet Surrender” after the John Denver song.


If you like the idea of the frugal adventure RV lifestyle that I describe on
this site and you’re looking for an RV that best fits the bill to take you to
the places I’m suggesting, then I recommend you look for a small motorhome.













Living In A Small Space


If you’re like some of our friends, you may be asking how we can live in such a
small space. The answer is, “We don’t. We cook our meals in the RV and sleep in
it but, unless it’s raining, the great outdoors is our living room and dining
room.”


Choosing Your Small Motorhome


When looking for a small motorhome, you do have a few choices:



  1. Class B (van-size camper)


  2. Class B-plus (slightly wider van-size camper)


  3. Pop-top van

  4. Truck Camper


  5. Small Class C (preferably under 27 feet in length)


Small motorhomes have become the fastest growing segment of the RV industry in
recent years and with the recent hike in

fuel prices

this trend is bound to continue.


Increasingly popular, lightweight RVs that are towed – such as small trailers
and tent trailers provide the cheapest option of all. Some can even be towed
behind a small fuel-efficient car and are possibly the most frugal option of
all.





Many people, including good friends of ours, pull a mid-size trailer and are
able to access many of the same camping areas we do. However, the overall
length, when combined with a tow-vehicle, will prevent you from exploring many
of the roads we take in our small motorhome. The solution, of course, is to
un-hitch the trailer and explore the road by car or truck before bringing the
trailer in.




The many advantages of driving a small motorhome can be broken into 2
categories: frugal (or cost saving) advantages and adventure advantages.


The Frugal Advantage Of A Small Motorhome


  1. Better fuel economy.

  2. Can access narrow forest roads and other dirt roads leading to free dispersed
    camping areas.

  3. Can “sneak-a-sleep” wherever overnight parking is allowed.

  4. With a larger RV, many people leave the RV behind and drive a tow vehicle to
    explore the area. With a small RV, your home and food is always with you so you
    can save on restaurant meals.

  5. If, while exploring, you find a great overnight spot, you can stay without
    having to backtrack to get your RV.


  6. Since every storage area in an RV seems to get filled, the less storage space
    you have, the less “stuff” you bring or are tempted to buy on route. (We still
    always bring stuff that doesn’t get used.)

  7. Can be used as a primary or secondary vehicle when not traveling.

  8. With the recent escalation in fuel prices, a small RV should hold its value
    better than a larger model.


The Adventure Advantage Of A Small Motorhome


  1. Easy to drive and park.

  2. Allows you to explore what’s down a narrow road without fearing that you may
    not be able to turn around.

  3. If you find a great spot, your home is with you so you are free to spend as
    much time as you like.

  4. You can be more spontaneous. Since all your gear is with you, if you find a
    wonderful hiking trail, camping area, or meet up with people, you can take
    advantage of opportunities without having to return to home base.

  5. With less indoor space in a small motorhome, you’re likely to spend more time
    outdoors which, after all, is the idea, isn’t it?
  6. Practicality – size does matter! With less storage, you’ll end up making more practical decisions (and keeping your RV more tidy).

    For example: one thing that larger trailers and motorhomes have that a smaller RV may not offer is automatic drop-down levelers. We solve our leveling issues with Lynx Levelers. We started off using wooden boards but these levelers are more practical, yet economical. They do the job better, they come with a handy travel case that takes up less precious storage space, they’re lightweight, and easy to grab and move around.

    Trust me, with a smaller rig, there will be more of that – keeping everything where it belongs is the biggest secret to making a smaller space work.


    Pros and Cons of Various Types


    Here is a comparison of the pros and cons (in my opinion) of the various types
    of small motorhomes:



    Truck Camper



    Pros:


    • Most trucks have higher clearance and perhaps even 4-wheel-drive and will allow
      access to rougher roads and more areas than any other small motorhome.

    • You may already own a truck and the financial outlay for the camper to add to
      it is much less than for a motorized RV.

    • If you already own a truck, additional savings include not having to insure or
      pay for annual license fees on another motor vehicle.

    • Some truck campers are made to fold down to a lower profile resulting in better
      fuel efficiency.

    • The camper can be removed from the truck and left set-up at a campsite while
      you take the truck for a drive. (From our experience this is usually just
      tricky enough that it’s not a feature you would take advantage of very often.)

    • When not traveling, you can remove the camper and have use of the truck as a
      primary or secondary vehicle.

    • You can upgrade to a newer truck, if you like, but still keep the camper and
      just transfer it to the new truck.



    Cons:


    • When you are in the camper you don’t have access to the driver’s seat to drive
      away without going outdoors first…could be a safety and inclement weather
      issue.

    • A truck camper is higher than a class-B or class-C RV so getting in and out of
      the camper will mean climbing more steps.


    Class B, B-plus, or Pop-top Van




    Pros:


    • When not traveling, it can be a primary or secondary vehicle with seating for 4
      to 6 people.

    • No wasted space – on most models the driver and passenger seats turn around to
      become part of your living space while camping.

    • Some B-plus models offer a slide-out for additional space

    • In an emergency, you can get to the drivers seat from within the camper very
      easily and drive away from trouble.

    • Most are built more aerodynamically so they get better gas mileage than either
      a truck with camper or a class-C.

    • Can be parked in any regular parking space that will accommodate a van or
      extended van.

    • Easily becomes a second vehicle when not traveling. Some models look more like
      a conversion van than an RV.



    Cons:


    • Very compact space. Not much storage.

    • The ceiling height and the bed may not be suitable for tall people.

    • Sleeps fewer people than a Class C or truck camper.

    • The bed generally has to be taken down in order to seat more than two for
      dinner.

    • Usually more expensive to buy than a Class C.


    Small Class C



    Pros:


    • Most have a more spacious living area than either truck camper or class-B.

    • More space means more storage space.

    • Slide-outs for additional space are available on some models.

    • No wasted space – the driver and passenger seats become part of your living
      space when camping.

    • In an emergency, you can get to the drivers seat from within the camper very
      easily and drive away from trouble.



    Cons:


    • Not very aerodynamic, so poor fuel economy.


    • Always looks like an RV and generally more bulky so, when not traveling, is not
      as suitable as a primary or secondary vehicle.

Other RV Types


This page describes small motorhomes only but you’ll find an excellent description of the differences between all types of motorhomes at RV Living Unlimited.



Buying A Used RV


If you’re not ready to buy, there are few affordable rental options but there
is finally one that I’ve found:

Lost Campers

is based out of San Franciso, California. Although their vans don’t have all
the amenities (water, toilet, extra battery power, etc.) of a motorhome, they
are an affordable way to experiment with the boondocking lifestyle, especially
when combined with

free campsites

throughout the southwest.


When you’re ready to buy, look for the best

used

RV you can afford – especially if this is your first RV purchase. You’ll find
out, as you use it, what your likes and dislikes are so buying new is not an
option until you’ve spent some time on the road. A new RV can also be very
expensive and will depreciate faster than most other vehicles would. Check the
used RV ads to see for yourself; whereas, a used RV will depreciate much more
slowly.





Being Frugal Means Getting The Best Value For Your Money!



The type of small motorhome you end up with may be determined as much by what
is available in your price range as any decision you make based on preference.
Any of the RV types described above will work fine. We’ve owned two Class B
campers (Roadtreks) since we started traveling nine years ago. Both were
purchased because we found them at a reasonable price.




The only thing we would change, given the option, would be to have a higher
clearance 4-wheel drive vehicle. That could expand our horizons even farther.
Although some Class B and C campers now offer these features, they are
generally quite expensive. For this reason, when we’re ready to shop for our
next small motorhome, we may find ourselves looking seriously at a truck camper.


I guess we should try that change soon, while we’re still in our fifties and
still able to manage those extra steps.































Return from Choosing A Small Motorhome


to Frugal-RV-Travel Home Page













Source

RV.Net Open Roads Forum: Class C Motorhomes: Class C boondocking

RV.Net Open Roads Forum: Class C Motorhomes: Class C boondocking

Topic: Class C boondocking




Posted By: sawyerloggingon
on 08/02/15 11:27am




Hi, I have been reading this forum quite a while now for good info but now I have a specific question. I have enjoyed my slide in camper for twenty years now and enjoyed where I can camp with it on my 4X4 PU but now we are retired and want to spend more time RVing and have more room so a class C upgrade may fill our needs. I realize it won’t go the places the PU with camper can but just where can it go? How is the traction for rather steep loose dirt roads? What about posi traction, do any class C have that feature. Thanks for any input and suggestions.




Posted By: Tiger4x4RV
on 08/02/15 12:28pm




If boondocking where you went in your TC is your top issue, evaluate the C by its height and width, the power of its engine, the number of tires on the ground. Will the unit you are considering actually fit into those spots? If you want a long unit, will the rear end drag?

My Tiger is a small C built on a 4×4 Chevy chassis. It goes just about anywhere that my driving skills can take it. It fits into spots where a taller and wider TC cannot go. It is probably smaller than you want, but Tiger does build some slightly larger units.

http://www.tigervehicles.com/
Most of my trips use 2WD and high clearance far more than they use the 4WD features. 4WD is usually for getting OUT of the difficult places, not for getting there in the first place. The truck has a limited-slip differential, which helps when more traction is needed.

If larger living quarters are most important to you, you might get a C which can tow a smaller 4WD vehicle to be used for exploring.

Happy trails!


2006 Tiger CX 4×4, 8.1 L gas V-8, Allison 6-speed




Posted By: tatest
on 08/02/15 12:42pm




Non-slip differentials are available for the rear axles used by G3500 Chevy and E-350/E-450 chassis. 4×4 conversions are available for the E-series.

Traction will be less an issue than clearances on steep dirt roads, particularly exit angles and hanging up at center with long wheelbase models. C’s typically have very long rear overhangs for load balanced to the axle capacities, and have clearance problems even on pavement. Mine likes to hang up going in and out of slightly sloped commercial driveways. But people do take these on dirt roads, where they know the road, and when they know their limits.

There have been C’s specially built for the way you’ve used your truck and camper. Most are on conventional cab rather than van cutaway chassis, and many were made using 4×4 models and might be amenable to chassis lifts. In current production, look at C’s from Tiger Adventure Vehicles. From about 10-15 years ago, there was an Xcursion line from Xplorer, a descendant of Frank Industries, one of the motorized RV pioneering companies. I think someone else has since gone into the business as Xplorer Motorhomes custom building a variety of models that will go where no conventional C motorhome can go.


Tom Test

Itasca Spirit 29B




Posted By: Quick trip
on 08/02/15 12:50pm




Be sure to check out the “Phoenix Cruisers” you can get 4X4 for any thing they build!
On their website look at the 4X4 build list.
Good Luck & Drive Safe!




Posted By: pconroy328
on 08/02/15 01:25pm




Traction was OK, clearly we’re not in a Jeep. But like others have said, it’s clearance that’s an issue. My black/grey values all hang lower and more exposed than I’m comfortable with/

If you high center your Jeep, you bust out your Hi Lift and get going. I have no idea how’d I’d move a motorhome off.

A few weeks ago we drove up a pretty tame, by 4WD or truck standards, road to a boondocking site. The road was wet and I found myself powering thru sections must faster than I would or should have just because I was scared of getting stuck.

Then there’s the whole issue of trying to turn a Class C around on a narrow shelf road.




Posted By: pauldub
on 08/02/15 01:42pm




A class C has a much higher percentage of weight on it’s drive axle than most 2 wheel drive vehicles which gives it a lot of traction. I suspect that traction would be the least of your obstacles with a typical 24′ or larger class C.




Posted By: jaycocreek
on 08/02/15 03:16pm




I have owned a number of pickup campers and class c motorhomes and chose a small class c this time. The reason, more room and I still have the ground clearance and ability to get into tight spots. A typical Chevy HD pickup is 19ft long bumper to bumper without overhang from a camper. My C is 21.6 which is like a 9.5+ camper on the back of a pickup but with alot more room in side.

99.9% of my camping is boondocking off road and this little C does great at it. Put on a hitch haul for extras like gen gas and a small quiet Honda, and go or hookup to your atv trailer and load whatever.

My last C was a 24ft Beaver, just a tad long for the hard to get places and did drag bottom once in a while in hard to go get places, the smaller C doesn’t do that.

[image]

Great for hunting and fishing.

[image]


’94 Ford F-350 DRW/460 EFI(91K miles)/Lance 9.6/Happijac’s/Helwig SB/Reese solid bar extension/Firestone bags and siped AT3’s.




Posted By: Holiday27
on 08/02/15 06:51pm




We love dry camping in the mountains. Do it a few times a year. We haven’t had any issues. Ours is pretty low but the weight gives it pretty good traction. Nothing crazy but we have a lot of miles of dirt roads on our RV! Washboard sucks…

I’m assuming you are from Washington based on sig. If so you could do a 4wd conversion at Quad van in Portland, Or., if needed. They are awesome! They did nice work on my RV (Upgraded 2wd Front end).


2002 27PBS Holiday Rambler (Aluminum sided/roof) Love it!

Previous RV’s

’94 Jamboree 22ft. (This beast had a 460 with tons of power)
’95 VW Eurovan camper (5 cyl. dog) Pulled a 3 rail fine though.
Tent”>
Borrowed folks ’84 VW Westfalia (water cooled)




Posted By: garyhaupt
on 08/02/15 07:18pm




“>][image]

I can offer some insights…and I will! Having had two C’s…one with one without, for getting up those nasty loose crudy tracks, a 4×4 does that. With only rear drivers, the rears will spin out and there you are. Even with limited slip differential, once you loose the rears, you are kinda done. The ablility of the 4×4 then to drag your sorry a** up and over, make it.

A person can buy a 4×4 kit from UjointOffroad http://www.ujointoffroad.com/

that can be installed. Know a guy that did that and he is some happy. You can always get it lifted..although you`ll need to find a 4×4 shop to do that. There are no kits for a Ford E 350.

There is a good sounding shop in Utah too..or, because you are Washington, take it up to Kamloops Light truck..they did mine. With the CDN loonie so low, it won`t be such a big bite.

Those that recommend their particular brand of 4×4 RV….all great names as long as you have deep pockets. I always suggest to folks…if you don`t have those particular resources or perhaps want a bit more room…buy the C of your choice and have it converted. The bottom line will be a whole lot less money for a whole lot more truck.

And pick an RV that has the plumbing up inside..not dangling down so you can grind it off on a passing rock. It`s also hard to deal with the angle of departure. Mine is all plated underneath, so I can drag it over crud and scratch the plate, not mess up the tanks and so on.

“>][image]
Gary Haupt


I have a Blog..about stuff, some of which is RV’ing.

http://mrgwh.blogspot.ca/




Posted By: BobandShaz
on 08/03/15 09:00am




Look at Jayco. They had a factory built 4×4 on the E450

Bob


Bob and Sharon

2006 Winnebago Sightseer 29R Ford F53. Roadmaster Eagle 8000. 2001 Ford F150 7700 4×4. Still shopping for toad brakes. FMCA F286179




Posted By: pnichols
on 08/03/15 09:52am




For a 2WD Class C that you want to take off-pavement, look for/do things like this:

– Get as short a one as you can possible camp with … 24 feet max.

– Get as short a wheelbase chassis as possible … 158 inches max between the front and rear axles.

– Whatever you get, put taller size (bigger diameter) tires on it. Every added inch of tire diameter gives you one-half inch more ground clearance at every point on the chassis. This is a better way to get ground clearance than a lift, because the tire diameter method continues to keep the overall center of gravity of the vehicle as low a possible while at the same time providing higher clearance for all chassis components.

– Look for a coach outer wall profile behind each rear wheel dual set that sweeps up straight starting immediately at the wheels. Some coach walls go straight back a little ways behind the rear wheels before they angle up to the back wall of the coach … this is not the best profile to minimize off-pavement damage to coach walls.

– Look for sewer/tank components that are mounted up high at frame level and, if possible … enclosed within a metal cabinet structure.

– Look for a built-in generator installation such that the bottom of the generator cannot be seen hanging down below the coach wall. The generator should be mounted right up at frame height … not hanging lower.

– If possible in a short length, get the Chevy 4500 or Ford E450 chassis under the motorhome so you can crawl along slowly better with more torque on tap and less transmission slippage due to the better pulling rear differential gear ratio used in these two heavier duty chassis.

– Get as narrow a coach body exterior width as possible …. 96 inches max.

– Get as low a roof height as possible …. commensurate with the minimum stand-up height you need inside the the coach.

– Do not get a model with slides. Slides add too much additional weight and weeken the overall coach wall structure for off-pavement use.

– Get a limited slip or posi-traction rear differential if possible.

– Use the angular-traverse method to the maximum extent possible whenever crossing depressions or going over humps when off-pavement.

A short and narrow Class C on a heavy duty chassis with it’s heavy items (propane tank, fresh/grey/black water tanks, built-in generator, coach batteries) mounted down low approximately at frame height like they are … has the potential for better overall rough road stability than slide-in truck campers where all or most of the weight associated with camping is above base frame height.

Keep us posted with what you come with!


* This post was

edited 08/03/15 07:17pm by pnichols *


Phil, 2005 E450 Itasca Spirit 24V




Posted By: Tiger4x4RV
on 08/03/15 10:43am




X2 what pnichols said except…196 inches??? You’d need an OVERSIZE LOAD pilot truck for that!




Posted By: jaycocreek
on 08/03/15 10:55am




Quote:

I realize it won’t go the places the PU with camper can but just where can it go?

You just might be surprised.I really can’t think of any place I have been with any of my pickup campers (all on 4X4’s) I couldn’t go with my currant Class C or even the 24′ I had but I don’t “hard Core 4X4” with a heavy camper on because things get broke with all the twisting and bending involved.

Those that have not owned pickup campers don’r realize how top heavy they are and the jacks stick out and hit things..Without the jacks mounted is much better,in my opinion..I loaded with suicide jacks on a couple.

The larger Class C you go will limit your abilities even going in and out of little camps because they will drag the rear.Been there done that on Class C’s/travel trailers and pickup campers.

Think short and ground clearance and you will probably go where you went before.I chose the class C I have because it will get into places I couldn’t get into with my 26ft trailer and even the smaller trailers because of total length…




Posted By: pnichols
on 08/03/15 11:43am




Tiger4x4RV wrote:

X2 what pnichols said except…196 inches??? You’d need an OVERSIZE LOAD pilot truck for that!

Nope.

The common “widebody” Class C has a coach exterior width of 101 to 102 inches.

Our Class C and camping style meets every criteria I show on my list except for not having a limited slip/posi-traction rear differential …. and except for having a widebody coach of 101.5 inches exterior width …. which means:

1) We most weeve between or steer around brush, trees, and rock cliffs (if possible) lining the roadway when off-pavement.

2) Two of us are quite comfortable when boondocking in our non-slide but widebody Class C … if we can possibly snake our way through to where we want to camp.

Many common non-widebody Class C designs fall into the 93 to 96 inch coach exterior width category.

P.S. Why should truck campers have all the fun? [emoticon]


* This post was

edited 08/03/15 07:19pm by pnichols *




Posted By: sawyerloggingon
on 08/03/15 12:18pm




Thanks everybody, lots of good info to digest. This is a big decision and I don’t take it lightly. I’m just a poor old retired logger and can’t afford a major financial mistake at this point in life. Personally I am fine with the rigging we have but my wife is needing more creature comforts so it’s a balancing act, get where I want to get and keep her happy too. Aint life grand.




Posted By: jaycocreek
on 08/03/15 12:21pm




Quote:

Why should truck campers have all the fun?

Exactly!

I was looking for, either or truck camper/class c and decided class c because of interior room.Having owned several of both in the past,it was a hard decision untill the wife got involved.[emoticon]

So my criteria was a camper to get into anywhere we go hunting/fishing and just messing around and the first unit we looked at met them all plus had all service records.

This one is two inches narrower than a Lance 850(94″) letting me get into places any pickup camper camper can and with the much roomier interior.I use my Honda 2k most of the time instead of the noisier Onan 4k unless we plan on using the air..It’s always nice to have an onboard gen set for those times you think you won’t need one and don’t bring one.

Good luck to the opp and his choice in a class c..After a pickup camper,I’m sure he will be a happy camper.




Posted By: Butch50
on 08/03/15 02:02pm




pnichols wrote:

For a 2WD Class C that you want to take off-pavement, look for/do things like this:

– Get as short a one as you can possible camp with … 24 feet max.

– Get as short a wheelbase chassis as possible … 158 inches max between the front and rear axles.

– Whatever you get, put taller size (bigger diameter) tires on it. Every added inch of tire diameter gives you one-half inch more ground clearance at every point on the chassis. This is a better way to get ground clearance than a lift, because the tire diameter method continues to keep the overall center of gravity of the vehicle as low a possible while at the same time providing higher clearance for all chassis components.

– Look for a coach outer wall profile behind each rear wheel dual set that sweeps up straight starting immediately at the wheels. Some coach walls go straight back a little ways behind the rear wheels before they angle up to the back wall of the coach … this is not the best profile to minimize off-pavement damage to coach walls.

– Look for sewer/tank components that are mounted up high at frame level and, if possible … enclosed within a metal cabinet structure.

– Look for a built-in generator installation such that the bottom of the generator cannot be seen hanging down below the coach wall. The generator should be mounted right up at frame height … not hanging lower.

– If possible in a short length, get the Chevy 4500 or Ford E450 chassis under the motorhome so you can crawl along slowly better with more torque on tap and less transmission slippage due to the better pulling rear differential gear ratio used in these two heavier duty chassis.

– Get as narrow a coach body exterior width as possible …. 196 inches max.

– Get as low a roof height as possible …. commensurate with the minimum stand-up height you need inside the the coach.

– Do not get a model with slides. Slides add too much additional weight and weeken the overall coach wall structure for off-pavement use.

– Get a limited slip or posi-traction rear differential if possible.

– Use the angular-traverse method to the maximum extent possible whenever crossing depressions or going over humps when off-pavement.

A short and narrow Class C on a heavy duty chassis with it’s heavy items (propane tank, fresh/grey/black water tanks, built-in generator, coach batteries) mounted down low approximately at frame height like they are … has the potential for better overall rough road stability than slide-in truck campers where all or most of the weight associated with camping is above base frame height.

Keep us posted with what you come with!

I still don’t understand what you are saying here, you are saying 193 to 196 exterior WIDTHcategory, I have never seen any RV over the 102″ exterior width. The 193 to 196 inch exterior WIDTH would equal a unit that was 16.08 feet or more and like was stated above you would need a wide load permit to drive that anywhere.

I think you might mean that they fall into a 93 to 96 inch width exterior which is 7′ 9″ to 8′ width.


Butch

I try to always leave doubt to my ignorance rather than prove it

2017 Ram 3500 Mega DRW

2018 Grand Design 303RLS




Posted By: DrewE
on 08/03/15 02:07pm




pnichols wrote:

Tiger4x4RV wrote:

X2 what pnichols said except…196 inches??? You’d need an OVERSIZE LOAD pilot truck for that!

Nope.

The common “widebody” Class C has a coach exterior width of 101 to 102 inches.

…….

Many common non-widebody Class C designs fall into the 193 to 196 inch coach exterior width category.

P.S. Why should truck campers have all the fun? [emoticon]

I’m with Tiger here…I believe you actually mean 93 to 96 inches, not 193 to 196 inches. [emoticon]




Posted By: ron.dittmer
on 08/03/15 02:50pm




sawyerloggingon,

I think you would be surprised how capable a smaller compact class B+ with Duel Rear Wheel (DRW) is on very primitive dirt and gravel roads. The only issue would be the amount of “rear over-hang”, potential for dragging the tail on the road when approaching or getting off steep grades. A 4×4 would be wise to have in deep mud and soft sand, but if those extremes are more than planned, then a DRW will serve you nicely. Just try to pick a scaled down rig to get you through over-growth and such.

Our now eight year old rig HERE is 23′-8″ long, 9′-10″ to the tippy top of the a/c unit, and only 93″ wide, yet it offers everything practical the bigger rigs have. You might want to check out the new ones HERE to see if new or used (with or without the optional slide out) appeals to you. They have been made for over 11 years now so you have flexibility with regards to price.

If you want the rig to have a lower profile yet to clear branches better, consider replacing the roof-top a/c unit with a pop-up sunroof, and manage with chassis a/c alone. That is a viable option for an older rig with a broken a/c unit.

2007 Phoenix Cruiser model 2350, with 2006 Jeep Liberty in-tow




Posted By: jaycocreek
on 08/03/15 02:52pm




Quote:

I’m just a poor old retired logger and can’t afford a major financial mistake at this point in life.

Retired logger here also. Spent most of my life living and working out of some sort of camper in the hills for work. Saves on gas or drive time with more time to relax.




Posted By: mlts22
on 08/03/15 03:50pm




If off-roading it with a 4×4 package, I wonder about the Rickson Wheels DRW to SRW conversion, which replaces two wheels with one 19.5″ that can handle the same weight. It might be an idea.

I wish more people made those here in the US. There are at least three (four counting Sportsmobile) upfitters (Quigley, U Joint Offroad, and Quadvan), so I’m actually surprised that some RV company isn’t making 4×4 “C”s at a decent price point here in the US.

This isn’t rocket science. The price difference for the upfit to 4×4 is about the same as going to a Sprinter chassis, and from there it is almost identical the upfitting needed. I’m amazed that only Phoenix Cruiser offers 4×4 as an option, when this would come in handy for virtually any person with a class “C”.




Posted By: sawyerloggingon
on 08/03/15 04:46pm




ron.dittmer wrote:

sawyerloggingon,

I think you would be surprised how capable a smaller compact class B+ with Duel Rear Wheel (DRW) is on very primitive dirt and gravel roads. The only issue would be the amount of “rear over-hang”, potential for dragging the tail on the road when approaching or getting off steep grades. A 4×4 would be wise to have in deep mud and soft sand, but if those extremes are more than planned, then a DRW will serve you nicely. Just try to pick a scaled down rig to get you through over-growth and such.

Our now eight year old rig ***Link Removed*** is 23′-8″ long, 9′-10″ to the tippy top of the a/c unit, and only 93″ wide, yet it offers everything practical the bigger rigs have. You might want to check out the new ones ***Link Removed*** to see if new or used (with or without the optional slide out) appeals to you. They have been made for over 11 years now so you have flexibility with regards to price.

If you want the rig to have a lower profile yet to clear branches better, consider replacing the roof-top a/c unit with a pop-up sunroof, and manage with chassis a/c alone. That is a viable option for an older rig with a broken a/c unit.

Very nice rig in your pics. I have looked at those and am impressed with the quality of that brand in particular and the B+ in general. In my OP I was linking them in with class C in my mind as far as traction goes but the smaller profile is definitely a plus.




Posted By: OLYLEN
on 08/03/15 05:49pm




Think about the service rigs for the logging operation. I have put many an RV just about anywhere there is a spur road. The turning around can be a problem but there is always a landing somewhere. Look at Elk season and the rigs you see in the woods. I would not drive blind into a new spur but if I had been there before no problem. As to traction the 450 has a good amount of weight on the drivers and can get most places. If your talking rutted out single tracks then you better get a BIG 4×4 built RV like the Unimog(SP) built on a big unit with winch’s and you need a ladder to get in the house area. From OLY and know a lot of the area you might be camping in.

LEN




Posted By: pnichols
on 08/03/15 07:30pm




Sorry guys about the exterior coach width typos in my two earlier posts … guess I hadn’t had enough coffee before I posted! My corrections in the two earlier posts now show in red.

Our widebody width in a 24 foot Class C has been my only concern to date in taking it off-pavement. However, as of yet it has never been an issue – just a “worry” for me.

For what it’s worth, I spend some time over in the Boondocking and TC forums. In viewing the many posted photos over there showing various TC rigs in camping spots, I see very few places where it looks like my Class C couldn’t have gotten to. Of course the photos usually don’t show what difficulty they may have had GETTING INTO some of those places!

P.S. I consider rigs like Ron Dittmer’s an excellent starting point for an affordable off-pavement Class C if it had a limited slip differential, was on the E450 chassis, and was 4X4 … if it also meets the other criteria on my earlier list.


* This post was

edited 08/03/15 07:37pm by pnichols *




Posted By: EMD360
on 08/04/15 12:56pm




Our Class C can’t handle 4 x 4 roads in Colorado–they are worse that backroads in Arizona. So it depends on where you camp. We have taken the RV on some great boondocking trips though with nobody else around us. Used 4 x 4 RV’s are difficult to find. I look for them all the time and have seem only a handful–most older and more miles than ours. We like to camp as close as possible to a wildlife preserve and hike there where bicycles, guns, horses, ATV’s etc. are not allowed. But now that we have grandkids we often use parks with electrical hookups for their comfort. If your wife’s needs are changing how many creature comforts are needed? If a bed in the back is what you need, you probably won’t be in back country much, but if a fold old or upper bunk bed is good enough, you can find something smaller that will be more versitile.


We’re hooked!

2003 Itasca Spirit 22e




Posted By: Gjac
on 08/04/15 02:32pm




I would not rule out a short(24-28 Ft) Class A as a good compromise next camper for your wife. Generally they have better suspension systems,higher GC and more capacities like FW, and larger grey and black tanks over a Class C. If you get one with full basement storage rather than the little cut out doors you will have more storage also. And lastly they are easier to get in and out of the front cab area especially if you have bad knees and even the real short ones come with a queen size bed. I dry camp 95% of the time and the things I find as being most important are water,storage,living space,ground clearance and traction in that order. Twice in 10 years I wished I had 4 wheel drive, every thing else is a compromise.




Posted By: RobertRyan
on 08/04/15 02:56pm




Tiger4x4RV wrote:

If boondocking where you went in your TC is your top issue, evaluate the C by its height and width, the power of its engine, the number of tires on the ground. Will the unit you are considering actually fit into those spots? If you want a long unit, will the rear end drag?

My Tiger is a small C built on a 4×4 Chevy chassis. It goes just about anywhere that my driving skills can take it. It fits into spots where a taller and wider TC cannot go. It is probably smaller than you want, but Tiger does build some slightly larger units.

http://www.tigervehicles.com/
Most of my trips use 2WD and high clearance far more than they use the 4WD features. 4WD is usually for getting OUT of the difficult places, not for getting there in the first place. The truck has a limited-slip differential, which helps when more traction is needed.

If larger living quarters are most important to you, you might get a C which can tow a smaller 4WD vehicle to be used for exploring.

Happy trails!

A lot of people here, can get to quite a few places without using 4WD. The rear overhang you get in U.S. Class C’s does not exist here, so much easier to get around.Ground clearance is also larger as a lot go Off Road here unlike a many in NA
[image]




Posted By: ron.dittmer
on 08/04/15 03:10pm




Gjac wrote:

I would not rule out a short(24-28 Ft) Class A as a good compromise next camper for your wife. Generally they have better suspension systems,higher GC and more capacities like FW, and larger grey and black tanks over a Class C. If you get one with full basement storage rather than the little cut out doors you will have more storage also. And lastly they are easier to get in and out of the front cab area especially if you have bad knees and even the real short ones come with a queen size bed. I dry camp 95% of the time and the things I find as being most important are water,storage,living space,ground clearance and traction in that order. Twice in 10 years I wished I had 4 wheel drive, every thing else is a compromise.

I cannot argue with Gjac…..all very good points.




Posted By: mlts22
on 08/04/15 03:22pm




Do short 24 foot class “A”s exist new on the Ford chassis? Gjac is definitely onto something because a class “A” has a lot more usable room than a “C” of the same size, especially if the “A” has decent basement storage.




Posted By: ron.dittmer
on 08/04/15 04:19pm




Lately it seems the stripped Sprinter chassis like the WB-Via is the only realy shorty class-A. I have not seen E350/E450 stripped chassis utilized for class A’s, but I have not researched that either. I have not seen but a few conventional class A’s less than 30 feet.

The Tiffin Allegro Breeze 28BR is a very short diesel pusher with capacities galore, unfortunately lacking a clothes closet. That model measures only 29′-7″ end-to-end. It offers so much in that short length. CLICK HERE is see the Breeze on Tiffin’s website.

To get a clothes closet you have to go with the 32BR adding 3.5 feet, not worth it to me, defeating the purpose of going short in the first place. It seems there are other means of getting around the lack of a closet.


* This post was
last
edited 08/05/15 08:15am by ron.dittmer *




Posted By: Gjac
on 08/05/15 07:14am




GBM made a 24 or 25 ft model that I looked at before I bought mine which was longer than what I wanted 33 ft. It is hard to find newer ones with more than 40 gals of FW. Older Fleetwood Bounders,Flairs had 100 gal tanks. I looked at a New short Daybreak with full basement storage, a large pass tru in the rear under the bed like a Mirada and it had a 100 gals of FW. These shorter lighter A’s with high CCC ratings will have much better GC because of the suspension. I like some of the older Monaco’s also.




Posted By: mlts22
on 08/05/15 12:09pm




The shortest I’ve seen on the E-350 chassis is the Thor Axis/Vegas, but that is 26-28 long… and with how parking spaces are, 25 feet is the utmost limit, so anything longer than that, might as well just go 31 feet and enjoy the added room available.




Posted By: ron.dittmer
on 08/05/15 12:25pm




mlts22 wrote:

The shortest I’ve seen on the E-350 chassis is the Thor Axis/Vegas, but that is 26-28 long… and with how parking spaces are, 25 feet is the utmost limit, so anything longer than that, might as well just go 31 feet and enjoy the added room available.

Our rig is 23′-8″ end-to-end and it will not fit in a regular parking space unless we are fortunate enough to find a space we could back into and let the rear over-hang grass or other. And since we tow most often, it is rarely applicable. Still we appreciate the shorter rig for a larger selection of campsites in national parks and such. We can almost always fit both the motor home and Jeep onto the same camp site. I don’t recall ever separating the two. The short standard Ford 158″ wheel base on the mo-ho also helps with hair-pin turns on mountain and canyon roads. My point is, bigger is better unless you spend a lot of your travels in national parks, monuments, etc. where “bigger” can limit you.




Posted By: RobertRyan
on 08/05/15 01:25pm




ron.dittmer wrote:

Lately it seems the stripped Sprinter chassis like the

WB-Via

is the only realy shorty class-A. I have not seen E350/E450 stripped chassis utilized for class A’s, but I have not researched that either. I have not seen but a few conventional class A’s less than 30 feet.

The Tiffin Allegro Breeze 28BR is a very short diesel pusher with capacities galore, unfortunately lacking a clothes closet. That model measures only 29′-7″ end-to-end. It offers so much in that short length. CLICK HERE is see the Breeze on Tiffin’s website.

To get a clothes closet you have to go with the 32BR adding 3.5 feet, not worth it to me, defeating the purpose of going short in the first place. It seems there are other means of getting around the lack of a closet.

Correct, the Winnebago and Itasca Class A’s are the only one built on the Sprinter




Posted By: fortytwo
on 08/05/15 08:14pm




The Axis, Vegas, Ace, are built on the Ford 350 chassis. Many compromises, including access for maintainability. 26 foot Class A’s on the F53 chassis exist, but are pretty tall for taking into tight trails. Be prepared for plenty of scratches. For a go anywhere C look at EarthRoamer. Sendy, but designed for off road use.


Wes

“A beach house isn’t just real estate. It’s a state of mind.” Pole Sitter in Douglas Adams MOSTLY HARMLESS




Posted By: chloe’s ranch
on 08/06/15 03:03pm




I agree with many of the replies so far. We recently did what Gary Haut suggested: getting a four wheel drive conversion done on a used short class C. Lots cheaper than a new 4×4 rv, and finding a used 4×4 that you like is almost impossible. Find a good used short class C that you and your wife like (comfortable floor plan.) Preferably on the E 450 chassis. Then get it converted to four wheel drive. We also had a camper on our four wheel drive truck for a few years, but then bought our used C to gain more room and creature comforts, but of course the C couldn’t go where our truck and camper could–primarily because of ground clearance issues. The conversion we had done involves a 4 inch lift, and then we changed over to 235-85-16inch all terrain tires which added another 1 inch of lift. That extra 5 inches of ground clearance really makes a difference on some of the rougher Forest Service roads. We recently were out boondocking at a beautiful spot for 4 days in the middle of Plumas National Forest. We were literally miles away from the next campers. Would not have driven in there without the conversion. Hope you find something you like and can afford, as it really is a great way to go “camping. ”




Posted By: Snowman9000
on 08/06/15 04:04pm




These lifted C’s, how do they handle on the highway? It seems almost risky from that standpoint.


2014 Sunseeker 2300 Class C (Chevy 4500)




Posted By: chloe’s ranch
on 08/06/15 05:06pm




Ours seems to drive pretty stable on the highway, partly because the added weight of the conversion is down low(the transfer case and front drive shaft). I’m sure it wouldn’t win a race in a slalom course though. We drive ours conservatively, especially on two lane mountain highways. Obviously this change is best suited for those of us that love getting off the main highways and into those out of the way boondocking spots on Forest Service or BLM land. (Although we plan to use the 4wd in the winter to do some overnight rv parking at one of our local ski areas that we like.)




Posted By: pnichols
on 08/07/15 09:48am




Snowman9000 wrote:

These lifted C’s, how do they handle on the highway? It seems almost risky from that standpoint.

That’s a very good point!

Generally, I’m against lifting of an off-road vehicle any more than is absolutely necessary to gain room for suspension movement.

A body lift raises a whole bunch of the vehicle that has nothing to do with making room for suspension movement, which of course has the negative affect of raising the vehicle’s center of gravity (which is not desired on side-sloping off-roads and in highway curves) … plus raising a cross-wind sail (the coach walls) a lot higher when going down the road.

Fitting as large as possible diameter tires – that will still clear the stock fender wells – is the best way to gain clearance for all low hanging chassis components, while at the same time keeping the center of gravity as low as possible.

If one must lift a Class C to add 4X4 capability, then start with the E450 chassis because it’s rear track is wider than that of the E350 (it’s rear differential ratio also is lower – for better off-road slow travel/crawling) … which gives it more lateral stability to deal with the vehicle’s higher profile.



Source

Class C RV, Motorhome Camper Rentals

Class C RV, Motorhome Camper Rentals

Renting a Class C Motorhome

After going over your options, you’ve decided on a Class C RV Rental! Great choice. Class C RVs come with an abundance of great attributes: a fridge and freezer, counter space, shower, microwave, stove, often times an oven, and many even come with slideouts, making living space abundant!

If you’ve ever driven a van or a truck, you’re that much closer to knowing what it’s like to drive a Class C. They are usually about the same width as a large cargo van, however, they’ll typically be much longer. The average weight of Class C RVs are from 10,000 to 12,000 lbs, and can range anywhere from 22 to 32 feet. Class C’s are usually 10 feet tall, while the width can range from 10-15 feet with the slideouts out, which is great for those who feel claustrophobic in tiny spaces.

Class C Models have plenty of storage for you and your family to use. Under the bed and couch, and sometimes under the dinette, you’ll find extra storage. Towards the back of the RV, there’s typically a storage compartment under the bedroom area, commonly referred to as the basement. This is where you can put your chairs, side tables, firewood, etc.

Some Class C Motorhomes are longer than 30 feet. There are campgrounds that don’t allow anything over 29 feet, and you need to make sure you let them know the exact measurement of the RV rental for safety purposes. I know it sounds silly, and you may not think that extra 1-2 feet hurt anything; however, certain spots are measured out to fit 29-foot motorhomes and nothing larger. This could cause you to be sticking out of the designated area, and might cause an accident.

Class C RV Rental Rates

While searching for a Class C here on RVshare, there is an option to choose just how much you want to spend. The prices range from less than $100 a day to over $950 per day. Keep in mind: just because you wish to spend less does not mean you’re going to be staying in something that looks cheap. An RV for $100 or less will still offer comfort, but simply will not have as many luxuries as a $1,000 RV rental would have.

Class C rentals are great when camping with families. However, just because it says it sleeps up to 6 people doesn’t necessarily mean that all 6 people will be comfortable. Class C RVs usually have one master bedroom, a pull-out couch, a dinette which turns into a bed, and a bed above the driver and passenger seats. Sometimes larger (and more expensive) RVs come with a little more comfort for the family.

The choice is ultimately yours. Do you want to spend more time exploring in nature? If so, a cheaper RV might be the one for you. You won’t need all the attributions that a luxury class C RV rental has to offer if you don’t plan on staying in it for much of your trip. If all you’ll use your rental for is eating and sleeping, there’s no reason to spend $500 – $950 daily on a rental.

However, if you wish to spend a majority of your time at your campsite watching TV or lounging around indoors, a luxury RV for a higher cost could be the one for you. Keep in mind that most Class C Rentals come with the same attributes. Some might come refurbished, adding value to the RV itself. Research the RV you’re going to rent before making your final decision. Talk to the owners about it, and figure out what it is you want (and need).

Finding A Class C RV For Rent Near Me

Now that you know the average rates and what a Class C rental has to offer, it’s time to find one near you. On RVshare, you’re able to search by your city (or state) and choose whether you want to pick up your rental or have it dropped off!

Let’s say you live in Oregon. As soon as you go to RVshare, you will see a search bar that allows you to type in either your city or your state. For demonstration purposes, we’ll type in “Ashland”. Right away, you’ll see RVs for rent in Ashland. However, if you don’t look closely you’ll make a big mistake. If you don’t type in “Ashland, Oregon” you’ll get RVs in Ashland, but Ashland could be anywhere! Virginia, California, Colorado, you name it. You need to make sure you type in the correct keywords in order to find an RV near you.

From there, you can select the price range, type of RV, number of travelers, the range of acceptable model years, and the length range you’d like to stay between. There is also an option to pick up your rental or have it dropped off. If you were camping two hours away, it might be better for you to look for an RV to rent in that area specifically. Contact the owner, strike a deal, and go RVing!

We’re glad that you made it to RVshare on your search for the perfect rental, and we look forward to being able to assist you in the future! Happy camping!

Source

New Class B Motorhomes for Sale in NH, MA, CT, NC, GA an FL

New Class B Motorhomes for Sale in NH, MA, CT, NC, GA an FL















Campers Inn RV carries a large selection of New Class B Motorhomes, also referred to as Travel Vans. We carry Class B Motorhomes from Pleasureway, Roadtrek, Thor Motor Coach and Forest River. Shop from our in-stock inventory below. If you have any questions, please Contact Us.

Want to learn more about motorhomes? Click here to download our Free E-Book Motorhome Buyer’s Guide.











Sort By

Filters

Motor Home Class B (64)

Motor Home Class B – Diesel (43)

Motor Home Class B+ (5)

Coachmen RV (7)

EHGNA (2)

Midwest Automotive Designs (27)

Phoenix USA (5)

Pleasure-Way (50)

Roadtrek (5)

Winnebago (16)

Ascent (6)

Crossfit (3)

Daycruiser (5)

Era (4)

Galleria (4)

Legend (5)

Lexor (16)

Passage (6)

Passage 144 (3)

Phoenix Cruiser (5)

Plateau (23)

Revel (5)

Roadtrek (7)

Tofino (5)

Travato (7)

Weekender (8)

2020 (41)

2019 (67)

2018 (4)

$60,000 to $75,000 (2)

$75,000 to $90,000 (7)

$90,000 to $105,000 (4)

$105,000 to $120,000 (8)

$120,000 to $135,000 (11)

$135,000 to $150,000 (10)

$150,000 and above (33)

Bunkhouse (5)

Rear Bath (8)

Two Entry/Exit Doors (6)

Two Full Baths (1)

5500 to 8500 lbs (2)

8500 to 11000 lbs (2)

20 ft and under (65)

20 to 25 ft (31)

Acworth GA (5)

Fredericksburg VA (16)

Jacksonville FL (10)

Kingston NH (20)

Leesburg FL (12)

Macon GA (5)

Madison AL (5)

Mocksville NC (7)

Philadelphia PA (3)

Raleigh NC (6)

Raynham MA (1)

Union CT (8)











‘;searchResultsHtml+=’

    ‘;$.each(currentVals,function(i,val)var selection=(currentCheckbox.parent(‘label’).html()||”).split(/]*>/gi);selection=selection[0];if(selection===”)return true;selection=selection.split(/]*>/gi);selection=selection[1];var valStripped=val.replace(/W/g,”);searchResultsHtml+=’

  • ‘+selection+’
  • ‘;});searchResultsHtml+=’

‘;searchResultsHtml+=’

‘;}}var stockNumEl=$(‘#faceted-search’).find(‘.SearchStockNumber’);if(stockNumEl.length>0&&stockNumEl.val()!==null&&stockNumEl.val()!==”)$(‘.selected-filters-wrapper’).append(searchResultsHtml);if($(‘.selected-filters-wrapper’).html()!==”){$(‘.clear-filters-toolbar’).fadeIn(200);}else{$(‘.clear-filters-toolbar’).fadeOut(200);}if(window.location.pathname==’/tow-guide-search’)};var updateCounts=function()var currentSearchCounts=;for(var prop in searchCombos[0]));if(currentVals[0]!==”));if(multiValueColumns[prop].filterMode===’and’)).length)}for(var i=0;i$(‘.ajax-unit-list’).offset().top){$(“html, body”).animate(,”fast”);}};$(“#faceted-search input[type=checkbox]”).change(function()).length



















  1. Mocksville NC


















    Clearance * Price Drop *

    • Mocksville NC
    • Stock #: 33173
    • Sleeps up to 3
    • Mecca/Taupe





    • MSRP: $114,427
    • You Save: $34,428
    • Integrity Pricing: $79,999




    • Payments From:
      $458 /mo.


















  2. Fredericksburg VA



















    FREE FUEL CARD VALUED AT $1,500 WITH PURCHASE! offer expires 4/21/19

    • Fredericksburg VA
    • Stock #: 36422
    • Sleeps up to 3
    • Black






    • MSRP: $110,916
    • You Save: $25,153
    • Integrity Pricing: $85,763




    • Payments From:
      $491 /mo.


















  3. Raynham MA



















    3.99% financing with payments at $483! See 3rd picture for more details!

    • Raynham MA
    • Stock #: 26216
    • Sleeps up to 3
    • BLACK






    • MSRP: $109,926
    • You Save: $11,335
    • Integrity Pricing: $98,591




    • Payments From:
      $565 /mo.


















  4. Kingston NH


















    Sofa bed! Upper tent bunk! USB charging ports!

    • Kingston NH
    • Stock #: 41095
    • Length: 17 ft 9 in
    • Sleeps up to 4






    • MSRP: $69,550




    • Payments From:
      $398 /mo.


















  5. Fredericksburg VA


















    • Fredericksburg VA
    • Stock #: 38762
    • Length: 20 ft 11 in
    • Sleeps up to 2






    • MSRP: $69,550




    • Payments From:
      $398 /mo.


















  6. Jacksonville FL


















    • Jacksonville FL
    • Stock #: 33946
    • Sleeps up to 3
    • Blk Leather/Ebony






    • MSRP: $113,736
    • You Save: $26,085
    • Integrity Pricing: $87,651




    • Payments From:
      $502 /mo.


















  7. Mocksville NC


















    • Mocksville NC
    • Stock #: 38908
    • Length: 21 ft 0 in
    • Sleeps up to 2






    • MSRP: $120,777
    • You Save: $30,782
    • Integrity Pricing: $89,995




    • Payments From:
      $515 /mo.


















  8. Madison AL

















    • Madison AL
    • Stock #: CFB-002
    • Length: 22 ft 2 in
    • Sleeps up to 2





    • MSRP: $127,852
    • You Save: $37,853
    • Integrity Pricing: $89,999




    • Payments From:
      $515 /mo.





















Zip Code

Enter your Zip Code to find RVs nearest you










*All calculated monthly payments are an estimate for qualified buyers only and do not constitute a commitment that financing or a specific interest rate or term is available. Financing terms may not be available in all Campers Inn locations. Campers Inn RV Sales is not responsible for any misprints, typos, or errors found in our website pages. Any price listed excludes sales tax, registration tags, and delivery fees. Manufacturer pictures, specifications, and features may be used in place of actual inventory in stock on our lot. Please contact us for availability as our inventory changes rapidly.






Source

Class C Motorhome | RV Camping

Class C Motorhome | RV Camping

Class C Motorhome









ClassC

Recreational Vehicle Types – Class C Motorhome

The most common type of RV for rental service, the Class C RV is a great getaway rental choice. Nationwide RV rental companies offer Class C RV rentals, and with nationwide customer support, your RV vacation should be worry free.

These vehicles may come equipped with either diesel or gasoline engines, slide out living space, satellite TV systems, and more. These RVs are great for multiple night stop vacations as it’s easy to pack and go.

Class C – Easy To Drive

RVRA (Recreational Vehicle Rental Association) defines a Class C Motorhome as:

Class C Motorhome – Scaled down version of Class A Motorhome, from 20 to 28 feet in length, built on truck chassis, usually with sleeping bunks atop cab. Living area accessible to driver’s area. Sleeps 2 to 6, if you include children. Has fewer features, less space and privacy than larger units, but is more economical to operate and is easier to drive and park.

The pictured motor home has a V10 Ford engine and includes: Onan generator, roof air, awning, gas/electric refrigerator, TV, vcr, am/fm cd player, satellite dish, day/night shades, microwave and three burner range with oven. The above pictured unit is only an example of what may be available to you as a Class C RV rental unit.

Source

New or Used Class B Motorhomes For Sale

New or Used Class B Motorhomes For Sale

Filters:

  • 90064: 200 mi radius
  • New

  • Used

  • RV Type: Motorized

  • Class B
  • Any Floor Plan

Towable RVs

Motorized RVs

Towable RVs

Motorized RVs

Hybrid (AKA Expandable) Floor Plan


1

Hybrid (AKA Expandable) Floor Plan

  • Hard-sided Travel Trailers with a tented fold down bed
  • Popular for those who need lightweight units
  • Room to live and move, but still easy to tow and store

Front Living Floor Plan


1

Front Living Floor Plan

  • Large, open layouts
  • Great for couples, but with flexible arrangements for guests
  • Commonly have opposing slides in the living area
  • Fifth Wheel models include high ceilings for extra space
  • Suitable for extended travel or full time living

Rear Bath Floor Plan


1

Rear Bath Floor Plan

  • A wide variety of floor plans, usually available in shorter trailer lengths
  • Often includes a large bathroom with extra storage
  • Many Rear Bath RVs have an outdoor kitchen

Bunkhouse Floor Plan


1

Bunkhouse Floor Plan

  • Bunk Beds make these ideal for family camping
  • Fixed beds always set up and ready to use without losing dining and living space
  • Larger floor plans may have a separate room with bunk beds
  • Wide range of floor plans to suit any budget

Rear Living Floor Plan


1

Rear Living Floor Plan

  • Spacious, open floor plan with kitchen, dinette and living areas together
  • Includes a big window and comfortable seating across the back wall
  • Perfect for couples
  • Larger models commonly have opposing slides in the living area for extra space

Toyhauler Floor Plan


1

Toyhauler Floor Plan

  • Garage in back for storing ATVs, motorcycles, bicycles and other big toys
  • Garage areas can convert to bunks or living space
  • Units often come with fuel tanks and generators for dry camping
  • Range from small travel trailers to large fifth wheels

A-Frame


1

A-Frame

  • Folds down for easy storage and towing
  • Small and light enough to be towed by a minivan or SUV
  • Security and insulation of a hard sided trailer
  • No canvas to care for or dry off after a camping trip
  • Typically sleeps up to 4 people

Front Living Floor Plan


1

Front Living Floor Plan

  • The most popular Motorhome layout
  • Most Motorhomes fit into this floor plan type
  • This floor plan style is available in budget to luxury price ranges

Bunkhouse Floor Plan


1

Bunkhouse Floor Plan

  • Always includes bunk beds, typically in a slide
  • A cab over bunk does not make a floor plan a bunk house on its own
  • Ideal for family camping, with plenty of room for kids
  • The bunk bed area may convert into an extra table or playing area.

Bath & a Half Floor Plan


1

Bath and a Half Floor Plan

  • A private master bedroom and bathroom in the rear
  • Second half bath
  • Large, spacious floor plans
  • Combine extra space and comfort, making them ideal for extended travel

Toyhauler Floor Plan


1

Toyhauler Floor Plan

  • Garage in back for storing ATVs, motorcycles, bicycles and other big toys
  • Garage areas can convert to bunks or living space
  • Ideal for both family camping or a couple’s adventure

Monthly Payment

Monthly Payment

Max Dry Weight

Max Dry Weight

Toyhauler (Garage Length)

Toyhauler (Garage Length)

Type and press the down arrow to browse available matches

Additional Attributes

Additional Attributes

no match found

Your local dealership may not have what you are looking for, but your Personal RV Shopper is standing by ready to access more than 25,000 RVs to find your perfect camper.

Class B motorhomes – New & Used

Camping World has nearly 4,000 motorhomes available every day, including new and used Class B RVs. You can find a range of units, from an efficient small Class B to a larger Class B+. Class B+ campers often include a slide to increase living space but are less than 30 feet in length. Built on a van platform, these small RV vans-or camper vans-are great for couples although some come equipped with a second dropdown bed, giving those units the ability to sleep up to 4 people.

With Camping World you can enjoy RV living in your Class B RV. With us it’s easy to find the right unit for you. Choose from popular brands such as Era and Travato from America’s best Class B RV manufacturers: Winnebago, Roadtrek, Coachmen, Airstream, and more.

* The estimated monthly payment calculated above is for informational purposes only and does not constitute an advertisement for any terms, an actual financing offer, nor any commitment to provide financing. FreedomRoads LLC makes no representations that any particular terms or financing are actually available. Your actual monthly payment will depend on your creditworthiness, the RV you purchase, the amount of your down payment, and the amount financed in your transaction. Your actual monthly payment may be higher than the payment estimated here, which does not include taxes, title and registration fees, lien fees, or any other fees that may be imposed by a governmental agency in connection with the sale and financing of the RV. It also may not include certain dealer fees, such as dealer-charged documentation fees. Your ability to obtain a financing offer, as well as the actual terms of such offer, will be based on the RV you select and the underwriting criteria used by the finance sources chosen by the company to review your credit application. The estimated monthly payment is based off of US Bank dealership RV rates dated 01/07/2019.

^Prices are inclusive of all available discounts. Government fees, state taxes, dealer fees and emissions testing charges as applicable will be added to comply with state vehicle codes. Freight and prep costs vary by state (Not applicable in CA, CO, OH, TX, TN, GA, LA, MS, WA, OR or UT). Inventory and floorplans vary by location, not all advertised manufacturers available at participating dealers. New units will be delivered from the nearest authorized dealer. Contact your area dealer for availability. VIN numbers posted at dealership. Advertised inventory available at time of production. New unit photography for illustration purposes only. May not be combined with any other offer and not applicable to prior sales. Offer(s) valid at any Camping World RV Sales or FreedomRoads dealer only. See dealer for details. © 2019 FreedomRoads, LLC. CAMPING WORLD and the CAMPING WORLD Mountain Logo are registered trademarks of CWI, Inc. and used with permission. Unauthorized use of any of CWI, Inc.’s trademarks is expressly prohibited. All rights reserved.

We have made every effort to ensure accuracy in the information provided. Specifications, equipment, technical data, photographs and illustrations are based on information available at time of posting and are subject to change without notice. To receive or verify current product information, please contact the dealership. FreedomRoads LLC, its related dealerships and technology partners are not responsible for typographical errors in price or errors in description of condition of a vehicle’s listed equipment, accessories, price or warranties. Any and all differences must be addressed prior to the sale of this vehicle. Decision to sell an RV regardless of price is solely determined by the selling dealer.

Source

Choosing a Compact RV or Camper for Retirement Travel

Choosing a Compact RV or Camper for Retirement Travel

An article I posted a while back about our solution for cheap retirement travel — a small RV — continues to receive a lot of traffic….

Nearly 10% of U.S. households own an RV of some sort, and the number is rising. Of households that don’t own an RV, almost 15% express some interest in purchasing one in the future, according to a University of Michigan study.

That earlier article of mine focused on operating costs for using an RV, so here I’m going to discuss some of the issues around the RV purchase decision.

Note: Even if you’re not very interested in RVs, you might enjoy reading the next section for some thoughts on retirement living. It details a few of the general lessons learned from our RV experience….

Lessons on Retirement Living

Before we delve into some details of choosing and purchasing an RV, let me abstract a few lessons learned about retirement living, from my time in and around RVs:

A big part of retirement for many is extensive travel. But travel can be expensive. An RV is one approach to cheaper retirement travel, but there are many others. You could house swap, work for room and board, teach English overseas, stay with friends, or travel in the off-season, for example. Whatever your style, unless you have unlimited resources, it’s wise to come up with some cheap angle for retirement travel.

An RV is a study in downsizing. Some people might see that as a hardship, but anybody who’s lived in one can tell you it’s not. Some things are easier, some things are harder. But the overall feel of living and camping in a small, mobile space is one of freedom. You realize how little is truly needed to be happy. In fact, being happy might be easier, the less “stuff” you have around. And that’s a feeling worth achieving whatever your retired habitat turns out to be.

Lastly, owning an RV is one strategy for being able to downshift your lifestyle relatively easily and quickly. Given the state of the world, especially if you are an early retiree, it is wise to have some strategy in mind for adjusting your lifestyle, should the future not go as planned. You hope not to need it, but nobody can predict 30-40 years into the future. Thinking ahead about ways to significantly reduce your expenses could make it much less painful to adapt to changes should the need arise, temporarily, or permanently.

And now for some particulars on the why’s and how’s of purchasing a small RV….

Why Buy an RV?

There are a number of reasons to own an RV motorhome or camper. For some, like us, it is a natural extension of the tent, truck, and van camping we’ve done over the years. But it is a bit more comfortable and flexible, as we get older. For others, RV’ing is an easy introduction to the camping experience. An RV can also function as a second vehicle, a second home, a guest room, for tailgating or picnicking, and for traveling to shows or large events.

Without a doubt, one of the prime appeals of an RV is the flexibility. You can go wherever you want, whenever you want, without worrying about advance reservations, schedules, lines, or baggage. We have done a number of trips that involved linking together stays with family and friends, camping in remote areas, transporting gear, taking on and offloading family members who were flying for portions of the trip — all with a minimum of pre-planning. This would have been impossible to accomplish at anything like the same cost using conventional transportation.

Modern RVs are plenty comfortable for all but the most discerning travelers. Fully equipped kitchens and bathrooms are standard. Even our small rig has hot and cold running water, gas heat, and air conditioning. We’ve been reasonably comfortable camping in conditions ranging from freezing to around 90 degrees outside. Larger, more expensive RVs have even more finely regulated heating/cooling systems.

A compact RV is a tool for more affordable vacations, however you must use it wisely to realize all the benefits. Studies have shown that families can spend up to 59 percent less when traveling by RV. But I doubt many people realize those kinds of savings, especially if they own large RVs and travel less often. My previous article reviews our own travel expenses in more detail.

Types of RVs or Campers

There are several kind of RVs and campers, and I’ll provide a quick introduction here. For much more about RVs in general check out the RV.NET Blog.

Your first decision is whether to own an all-in-one motorhome or a tow-behind 5th wheel/travel trailer. I’ve always loved the simplicity and security of a motorhome (you don’t have to step outside the vehicle at night to go to bed when you’re traveling). But if you already own and need a truck, then a camper you can pull behind makes lots of sense. Another advantage to towing is being able to unhitch and use the truck for local transportation once you reach your destination. (Only the very smallest motorhomes, like our van-based unit, are very practical as local transportation.) If you are going to pull behind, my sense is that 5th wheels (trailers that use a heavier, rotating coupling to the tow vehicle) are roomier and more stable to tow, but I claim no great expertise in this area.

Motorhome RVs break down into several classes:

Class A RVs are built on a bus-like chassis. These are the big rigs of the road. New prices typically start in the 6 digits, and they can be as comfortable, and as well-appointed, as the finest homes. Class A’s are impressive vehicles, and it’s great fun browsing through new and used models to see all the clever living ideas. But you need to be realistic about their role in your retirement picture, especially if frugality is an element of your retired life. Class A’s are the most expensive RVs to own and operate. In most cases, they could save you money as a home replacement, but not as a vacation vehicle.

Class C RVs are an alternative if you need the space of a Class A for full-time or extended living, but want to economize. The Class C’s are built on a truck or van chassis, which makes them somewhat cheaper. The original body is cut away and replaced with a much larger living compartment. New models can be found from about $50K-$60K and up. They can have most of the same features as a Class A, though there is typically a bit less living space (the cockpit is usually not available as living area), and less storage space (the rigs sit lower to the ground).

Class B RVs are built on a van chassis, using the original body or only small extensions to it. These are the smallest full-featured RVs on the road. Some are almost indistinguishable from a conversion van, yet contain the full complement of RV luxuries: stove, fridge, microwave, hot/cold water, shower, TV, gas heat, AC. Some of the fancier units contain “slide-outs” to give you a few extra feet of living space.

Unfortunately “smaller” doesn’t mean “cheaper” in the case of Class B RVs. Because they contain most of the same features as their larger counterparts, but must be constructed in a tighter, less uniform space (our Class B contains impressive custom cabinet work contoured to the sides of the van body), expect to pay more for them than the larger Class C’s. Class B’s start in the $80-$90K range. On the other hand, these RVs can typically be serviced in any auto shop — so you don’t have the expense or inconvenience of taking it to a specialized truck or RV shop.

For more about these smallest RVs, check out the Class B Forum.

Platforms for Compact RVs

All motorized RVs essentially have two manufacturers: one of the major auto companies makes the chassis, then an RV manufacturer (there are many of these) takes delivery of that chassis and constructs an RV on top of it. For the larger RVs the chassis is a bare-bones affair and the RV takes shape around it. For the smaller RVs, usually some or most of the chassis body is reused, possibly with some extensions or cutouts.

For what it’s worth, I have a slight preference for the Ford chassis on smaller RVs. Maybe it’s because this is a finance blog, and Ford was the only one of the big three manufacturers not to need a bailout in recent years! But we’ve owned several Fords over the years and they’ve been solid vehicles. The cockpits are cleanly designed and fairly consistent from vehicle to vehicle. Ford is a commonly used RV chassis, so you may see more choices in Ford-based models. But if you have a preference for Chrysler or GM, I don’t know of any hard facts to dissuade you, so shop for those.

The upstart RV chassis is the diesel Mercedes Sprinter, the second generation of which made its debut in early 2007. Its tall, narrow profile is a common sight in commercial cargo operations these days, and the Sprinter is rapidly gaining ground in the RV industry as well. (We probably would have bought a Sprinter-based RV, except that there were virtually no used ones available when we purchased three years ago.)

The Sprinter’s most compelling feature? A 6-cylinder diesel engine with amazing fuel mileage: generally in the low 20 miles per gallon for a loaded rig. That’s three or four times what a conventional RV gets. And it’s about 7 or more miles to the gallon than our relatively fuel efficient E350-based rig. Though keep in mind that the relative cost of diesel fuel fluctuates, so the increased fuel efficiency may not help your pocketbook out as much as you might like.

If you begin shopping for a compact RV, you’ll soon run into two prominent manufacturers, both Canadian: Roadtrek and Pleasure-Way. These companies occupy the top two spots in the Class B retail market share according to Statistical Surveys Inc. They both make fine products. Roadtrek appears to be the slightly larger and more high-end company, with historically a more extensive product line. Pleasure-Way might be a little less expensive. If you find a floor plan that suits you from either company, you won’t go wrong.

We own a Pleasure-Way and love it. (Though we’re still a bit inhibited about that name — maybe something doesn’t quite translate from the Canadian?) At the time we bought, Pleasure-Way offered the only widely available small RV with a completely private bathroom, a big plus. Our Pleasure-Way is a beautifully and cleverly crafted machine that has functioned well on more than a dozen major road trips now, spread over 3 years and 40,000+ miles.

Now that the world is focused on the cost and availability of energy, and compact RVs are here to stay, the other mainstream manufacturers are jumping on the wagon and offering their own Class B and related models. Winnebago has its Era and View line for example, which may be a bit larger than the typical offerings from the Canadians. It’s probably safe to say that every major RV manufacturer will have an entry in this category before long. And the good news, so far, is that they mostly appear to be of high-quality. Perhaps it’s just too difficult to build something shoddy in such a small space.

That brings us to a discussion of some key features….

Evaluating Key Features

I won’t offer a complete rundown on every system in the common RV here. They are, after all, effectively a house combined with a motor vehicle. So your experience with buying cars and houses will stand you in good stead. And a little additional research and education to supplement those skills will be time well spent.

An RV has gas, electrical, plumbing, and HVAC systems that are not so different from their land-based counterparts. At a minimum, you want to make sure these are in good working order and reasonably easy to operate. But let me touch on a few specific components, to pass along what wisdom we’ve gained:

generator — I was once a humble tent camper who frowned on those uncouth RV generators. But I’ve changed my tune a bit. Today’s generators are reasonably quiet and burn tiny amounts of fuel compared to larger engines. Used intelligently and considerately (only during posted hours at campgrounds), they are an essential tool for efficient life on the road. They give you AC power at the touch of a button, and there are certain appliances — microwaves and air conditioners — that won’t run any other way. Generators also let you recharge your house batteries and battery-powered gadgets while off the grid. A final bonus of a generator is that it can double for backup power at home: We ran an extension cord indoors from ours last year when a storm took out the power for several days, and it saved a fridge-load of food.

inverter — An inverter is an electronic device that converts 12 volt DC power to the 110 volt AC power used by household appliances. Most RVs come with one behind the scenes. Make sure yours does, and exposes some receptacles you can use. It’s a huge convenience to be able to recharge laptops and cell phones without needing any special adapters, without even needing to run the generator, such as at night in quiet campgrounds.

fridge — An always-running gas/electric fridge is a huge convenience on the road. Perhaps one of the main selling points of an RV is being able to transport and eat your own fresh food. Don’t be put off by the seeming small size of RV units compared to your gargantuan household model. Our 3.8 cubic foot Dometic fridge has been a workhorse. We have yet to need more space: we routinely fit about a week’s worth of cold groceries. A bit of unpacking and repacking and some attention to sequencing will make it work.

microwave — A microwave is another huge convenience on the road, from heating up leftovers to brewing a quick cup of coffee or tea (you can save a fortune on Starbucks). Safe to say every modern RV comes with a microwave, but make sure yours is functional and conveniently located.

TV/stereo — To each his own, but we use ours surprisingly little on the road. Even though we love music, and watch plenty of movies at home, there never seems to be enough time on the road. There is always so much else to do and, when nighttime rolls around, we are tired from a day of outdoor adventure.

awning — Another component we rarely use is our roll-out awning. It seems like a great idea and looks beautiful in photos, but we never seem to stay in one place long enough. Perhaps that is a downside of needing our small RV for local transportation. Or maybe by the time it’s hot enough to need the awning, we are generally inside running the AC. Or maybe it’s that we just don’t sit around that much….

tires — With long periods parked in the sun, punctuated by heavy hauling in between, RV tires take a beating. Our off-brand set died in disturbing fashion after only about 10,000 miles. The four pricey Michelin’s I replaced them with are showing virtually no wear after two years, and are expected to go 90,000 miles total. When the time comes, buy quality tires: it’s worth the peace of mind.

The Purchase Process

In my opinion, used is the only way to buy an RV. They are big-ticket items, with such a large first year depreciation (reportedly from 25% to 40%), and such a plentiful pre-owned supply, that it only makes sense to buy used. After all, that’s how most of us buy our homes. If you aren’t comfortable checking out the rig yourself, you can pay a competent RV mechanic to do the job for you. And once you spend a few nights in your new quarters, you’ll feel like it was always yours.

We found our van advertised on eBay. Other prominent places to find used RVs are at RV Trader and your local Camping World. If you’re anywhere near New Mexico (or even if not, because they’ll pay your airfare under certain conditions), check out Vantastic Vans, a dealer specializing in both new and used small RVs.

Our van was offered by an obviously established dealer in another state, so I was reasonably confident doing the transaction online. I emailed them copies of various documents plus a $1,000 deposit via PayPal, and the rig was ours. We flew out a week later with a certified check to conclude the deal.

I had with me an extensive inspection checklist and did not plan to turn over the check until the van met our expectations. When we arrived we went right to work: I crawled over, around, and under the unit and inspected everything. We exercised every system onboard: We fired up the fridge and stove. We ran the microwave. We played music and watched videos. We flushed the toilet. We unrolled the awning. We ran the gas heat. (The air conditioning was already running constantly because it was over 100 degrees outside!)

When it was all over we had found a number of significant but fixable problems, and our trip was delayed for a couple days while the dealer addressed them all, at their expense, including reimbursing the extra days on our rental car. In the end they felt a little beat up, but we got the mint condition vehicle that was advertised, and they got paid.

RVs are houses on wheels. They are a bit different from land-based homes, neither better nor worse. These modern campers aren’t particularly complex — using relatively old technology compared to most of our digital toys. But any system that runs only occasionally can develop some problems. Expect a shakedown period after you take possession, before you get everything working and customized to your taste.

In the end, it will likely all be worth it. We have no regrets about our choice of a compact RV motorhome for retirement travel. We feel it has already paid for itself, with a dozen memorable vacations, and the promise of many more….

Source